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Situated in the southern part of Australia, Adelaide is Australia's fifth largest city.  The city is named after Queen Adelaide, and was the planned capital for a freely settled province in Australia.  Today this beautiful city is full of large sweeping streets and interesting festivals and events.  Adelaide makes for a great base to visit the nearby wine regions, to visit nearby beach suburbs such as Glenelg, to learn to surf , or to hike the nearby Mt Lofty Ranges.
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Travel Tips from people who've been to Adelaide
Hire a car and drive on the Great Ocean Road to Melbourne, or use the Grampian Mountains as a base to explore a new section of the Road each day.
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Considering that Adelaide is the capital of South Australia, I had expected a bustling metropolis packed with businessmen in suits rushing back and forth between meetings, and I was almost planning on moving on as soon as I got here. It just goes to prove that you should never jump to conclusions. I like Adelaide. I like it a lot. If it can be possible for a big city to retain the charm of small town Australia, Adelaide seems to be having a pretty good try - the day to day business seems to be hidden away behind the scenes where it's out of sight and mind, while the streets remain relaxed and, well, Australian. Everywhere I went as I wandered, I saw fountains with people sitting around on deckchairs listening to music playing in nearby bandstands, colourful markets full of equally colourful traders, or street entertainers striding about on stilts. It is also incredibly easy to find your way around as the city is built on the grid system familiar in Australia and North America, making it very hard to get lost. Trams trundle up and down taking people from place to place, the pedestrian malls are cobbled and full of atmosphere, and the Torrens River runs right through the city with both banks covered in parkland and wide grassy verges where people sit eating picnics and soaking up the sun. In fact, one of the things which sets Adelaide apart from other cities is the sheer amount of green space. And of course, Adelaide is home to the Australian Oval where they routinely practice thrashing us at Cricket. In other cities around the world, it almost seems as though there's a competition going on to see who can build the biggest skyscraper or the largest office block - and if anything inconvenient such as a tree should get in the way, then they just pull it up and pretend it never existed. In Adelaide, it's obvious from the moment you arrive that the buildings are secondary features and are built around a beautiful city of parks, gardens and rivers - how rare it is to see the environment being considered as part of the future. My guide book describes Adelaide as a city of wonders and possibilities, a city of art and festivals, and it's now obvious to me why people have been heading here from all over the country in the last few days for the national cycling event - the city is criss-crossed with cycling and walking trails running through the parklands and along the river, and it's a pleasure to get around by leg power rather than petrol. The reason for Adelaide's apparent wish to stick two fingers up at the accepted way of designing a city harks back to it's inception and design by William Light in 1836 as a River Town of public spaces, wide boulevards and surrounded by parkland - a place inspired by the then unusual concept of civil liberties, where people could relax and worship freely within the "City of Churches". Unbelievably, this wasn't initially a very popular idea - but thankfully Light went ahead anyway, people came around and not much has changed in Adelaide over the years. Neither is there any sign that anybody feels a need to start expanding all over the surrounding green belt as many cities have done in recent years.

You can read my full travel journals at http://www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer and http://www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer2
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Open air shopping Malls in Australia all seem to be the same and most towns and cities have several. A pedestrianised street runs along a few blocks in the middle of the town and is lined with shops, cafes and restaurants. As there are no cars allowed, there's no need to cross the street or wait for the lights to change so you can spend a carefree afternoon just browsing, drinking or hanging out to watch other people browsing and drinking. More and more malls in Australia are adding wireless internet access, which means that it's also becoming increasingly common to see people sitting about on benches using their laptop and surfing the web, quite often for free. Rundle Mall in Adelaide is a large multi-storey undercover shopping centre, and is by far the largest I've seen for a while - in fact, it is considered by some to be the largest shopping precinct in Australia. Outside on the street, just in case you've got so caught up in the shopping and forgotten just how surreal Australia can be, visitors are welcomed by the sight of two giant stainless steel balls (The Mall's Balls) piled one on top of the other for no adequately explored reason. Inside, the place is huge - the entire ground floor is a food court selling every type of food imaginable, and above it are six floors containing every type of shop under the sun from supermarkets to sex shops. Next door is a smaller food court in which, when I returned here with Tanya in 2002, we spent virtually every day sitting and eating donuts and banana smoothies - something which vendors in Britain seem unable to make. Smoothies in Australia are generally made out of real fruit, and you can watch them stuff bananas into a blender and create the smoothie in front of you - in Britain, on the other hand, there seems to be a tendency to use banana flavour ice cream, which isn't quite the same thing. Adelaide is also famous for its statues. Wherever you go in the city, you'll find everything from statues recalling famous figures from Australian history to the bizarre street art that springs up everywhere. On the pedestrian precinct outside Rundle Mall, litter bins along the street are decorated with full size bronze statues of pigs standing on their hind legs and nosing through the rubbish, other bronze pigs just standing around waiting their turn. These pigs, I have learned since, all have names - Truffles, Horatio, Oliver and Augusta, should you wish to say Hello on your way through. Central Market is a large and diverse area of the city in which you can buy virtually anything you fancy to eat from the tons of speciality stalls selling anything from Cheese to Thai food. You can sit down to eat at a restaurant or scamper from stall to stall bargaining with the cheerful local vendors over vegetables you've never even heard of. The Market is surrounded by cafes, restaurants, fish and chip shops, and with Chinatown just around the corner you could easily spend your day browsing here and go straight on for a meal and a night out afterwards without having to go home in between.

You can read my full travel journals at http://www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer and http://www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer2
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Recent Updates for Adelaide
Trevor B. has added a photo for Adelaide
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Trevor B. has added a photo for Adelaide
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Fast Furious Ever wondered what sort of a chance you would stand if chased by a Cheetah? Well, just to put the lightning speed of this.. (More)
Trevor B. has added a photo for Adelaide
1 year ago
Trevor B. has added a photo for Adelaide
1 year ago
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