Planning a Trip to China

Beat Time to Visit China is October.
 .China is a vast country with wide-ranging climatic conditions, so a decision about the best time to visit should be based on the regions you plan to tour and the kind of weather you enjoy.
 Autumn
Normally, the most comfortable season of the year is early autumn (September to early October). During that period, temperatures are reasonable throughout China (about 50-72F) with a limited amount of rain. September for example is the only month in the year when the ancient and valuable paintings of the Beijing Palace Museum are displayed due to proper climate conditions (low humidity and proper temperature).

It is right now the best time to visit Beijing China

want to know more about China tourism information , please visit : http://www.bestbeijingtours.com

Last edited Sep 20, 11 4:02 PM. Contributors: Xin P.
Best Time to Visit China 
Dalian, Fujian Province, China
When most Australians go to live abroad for the first time, they usually take the "safe" option and go to the UK. If they are feeling extra adventurous, maybe they'll go to America or Canada. My best friend and I decided to go to Dalian, China, and I have no doubt in my mind that it was the best experience of my life. When Chinese people refer to Dalian, they allude to one catch-phrase - "Dalian is a beautiful city," or "the pearl of the orient." While the beaches don't have the pristine sands of Western Australia, or the magnificent skyline of Melbourne, Dalian is undoubtedly one of the nicer cities of China. Dalian is one of the smaller Chinese cities with only a population of about 6.2 million(yes this is small), but only has and urban population of about 3 million including a developmental zone. Dalian governs the entire Liaodong Peninsula of North-East China, while mountains surround the northern end of the city, which makes for many-a lovely hiking trip through the mountains and surrounding townships. As Dalian is a seaside city, there are also plently of opportunities for strolls along the coast when weather permits. As with most of China, there is also plenty to do and costs were minimal. As an English teacher, I was able to live on about 500RMB per week(about $70US) and this included eatling out every night, and having an active social life. Having travelled in most provicences of China, Dalian definitely had the best food, as unlike the rest of China, it food was niether sweet or laden with MSG. For $1 US, you could enjoy a tasty Chinese BBQ with lamb sticks and Corn bread, before heading out for an evening of drinking and playing Jenga or connect 4 at Noahs Ark or Dave's Bar. In the summer, Dalian comes alive in it's many paks and squares where you can join in with the locals and play Hacky Sack(with a feathered ball thing), or a version of Duck Duck Goose they play where someone walks around everyone who are standing in a circle and drops the hankey behind you before being chased (sadly I got caught and ended up having to stand in the middle with the other losers singing "We Will Rock You". In Zhongshan Square, in the city, they also do dancing. In our mis-guided attempts however to learn the steps, we ended up leading the locals in dancing the "Nutbush" to their music! Don't get me wrong, Dalian had it's drawbacks. Hygiene in retaurants, a hole in the ground for a toilet, the beaches had pebbles instead of sand, and communicating and accepting the beuracracy of their customs was often frustrating -as you would expect, but overall, Dalian was a fabulous experience, and I highly recommend it.
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Turpan, Xinjiang Yughur Autonomous Region, China
Don't do a whirlwind tour of the area through CITS agency. It looks cheaper upfront, but it isn't. You must also pay for each entrance fee. You see more places, but are rushed. Emin Minaret is a wonderful walk on the out skirts of town, and is best seen at sunrise. In the bus station lobby there are a few agencies where you can hire a car for the day - don't be afraid to bargain! You should be able to hit up a few places for well under Y200/person. Don't bother paying to see the "Flaming Mountains". You can get your driver to slow down (sometimes local cops keep people from doing so in order for them to buy a Y40+ ticket to see them), and grab a few shots from your window. Tuyok is a must see! There are pictures galore and is best done in the morning due to temperatures. Be careful of taking pictures of locals, they may insist on your paying for the picture. Gaochang ruins can be seen on the way back from your car ride. Jiaohe ruins is a short taxi ride away or a pleasant bike ride. The cheapest and cleanest place to stay is the bus station hotel and its much easier to travel back to Urumqi via bus to catch a train to your next location. The best time to visit is during the fall or spring seasons since the region does get bloody hot and cold.
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
I've visited Beijing and passed through it a good number of times now and have yet to see a smog free day. Visit the wall (jinshangling or simitai are the best bits), wizz round the temple of heaven and the summer palace and get out of there. China is an amazing place with some beautiful scenery and historic sites, but Beijing is nowhere near the top of the list of 'must see' places in China in my books. Controversial?
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Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China
Best time to travel in Hangzhou is from March to April or in summer as the public transportation such as bus will not provide service after 8:00p.m. and the day time is shorter in winter. Don't try to buy tea from the farmer directly unless you are expert on this.
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Guilin, Guangxi Province, China
Guilin is a beautiful place to visit. The best season "offically" is Apr to May, but I advice you to go on Mid-Feb. and Mar. Those are the times when it is already warm enough to sit outside. The most popular place you can visit is the west street in the town called Yong Shuo. There are bars, and small faminly hotels that you can hangout to. You have great chances to meet new friends just go and sit in a bar. If you are a fan of outdoor climbing, Yongshuo is also really famouse with the natural mountain climbs. Find yourself a local guide, do hinking trip around Lijiang river, visit the local valiges, you are going to experince the most beautiful, truly Chinese scenaries. Once you got to Yangshuo, you should rent a bike for the day. It's really cheap, almost cost you nothing, and yet you go anywhere you like fast enough with it. You don't want to go by car because you need to enjoy.
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China Tourist Information  
Dalian, Fujian Province, China
When most Australians go to live abroad for the first time, they usually take the "safe" option and go to the UK. If they are feeling extra adventurous, maybe they'll go to America or Canada. My best friend and I decided to go to Dalian, China, and I have no doubt in my mind that it was the best experience of my life. When Chinese people refer to Dalian, they allude to one catch-phrase - "Dalian is a beautiful city," or "the pearl of the orient." While the beaches don't have the pristine sands of Western Australia, or the magnificent skyline of Melbourne, Dalian is undoubtedly one of the nicer cities of China. Dalian is one of the smaller Chinese cities with only a population of about 6.2 million(yes this is small), but only has and urban population of about 3 million including a developmental zone. Dalian governs the entire Liaodong Peninsula of North-East China, while mountains surround the northern end of the city, which makes for many-a lovely hiking trip through the mountains and surrounding townships. As Dalian is a seaside city, there are also plently of opportunities for strolls along the coast when weather permits. As with most of China, there is also plenty to do and costs were minimal. As an English teacher, I was able to live on about 500RMB per week(about $70US) and this included eatling out every night, and having an active social life. Having travelled in most provicences of China, Dalian definitely had the best food, as unlike the rest of China, it food was niether sweet or laden with MSG. For $1 US, you could enjoy a tasty Chinese BBQ with lamb sticks and Corn bread, before heading out for an evening of drinking and playing Jenga or connect 4 at Noahs Ark or Dave's Bar. In the summer, Dalian comes alive in it's many paks and squares where you can join in with the locals and play Hacky Sack(with a feathered ball thing), or a version of Duck Duck Goose they play where someone walks around everyone who are standing in a circle and drops the hankey behind you before being chased (sadly I got caught and ended up having to stand in the middle with the other losers singing "We Will Rock You". In Zhongshan Square, in the city, they also do dancing. In our mis-guided attempts however to learn the steps, we ended up leading the locals in dancing the "Nutbush" to their music! Don't get me wrong, Dalian had it's drawbacks. Hygiene in retaurants, a hole in the ground for a toilet, the beaches had pebbles instead of sand, and communicating and accepting the beuracracy of their customs was often frustrating -as you would expect, but overall, Dalian was a fabulous experience, and I highly recommend it.
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China
Bargaining for the price of hotel rooms in China is perfectly acceptable. As a matter of fact you would be silly not to, as all the Chinese do it. Room rates are displayed on a sign at reception, but be aware that these are the top prices. It means you shouldn't pay that much, unless all other hotels are full or there are hardly any rooms left.
I have only ever paid top prices in Beijing and Shanghai, everywhere else I got the room for around 20 or 30% less.
Make sure you have seen the room before negotiating, and check that the toilet flush, lights and tv work and that the sheets are clean. If not, ask for another room and definitely insist on having clean sheets, even though they will most likely tell you that there aren't any, we found cupboards full of clean sheets on many occasions! The Chinese seem to have an aversion to cleaning...

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Yining, Xinjiang Yughur Autonomous Region, China
Traveled there in 1994! Came in the "back door" to China- over one of the old silk road routes. Expected it too be really run down and dirty- full of coal dust. Ended up in the first privately built hotel in that province- beautiful! The Hong Chinese side of town was very nice and "modern"- the Uigur (Muslim) side of town was very degraded- obviously poor people and high unemployment. Food was excellent! Real Chinese food is MUCH spicier/hotter than expected- and the Uigur food is a little bit bland- lots of noodles! Be prepared for Asian toilets- grooves in the ground with and without running water. In other words, crouching not sitting!!!
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Pingyao, Shanxi Province, China
Make sure you stay in a hotel with working toilets and indoor heating in the winter. (It's harder than it sounds.)
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
If you want to talk to Chinese in Beijing you have to speak Chinese or have a guide book with chinese signs, for example: if you ask a Chinese where is toilet, show her/him chinese word in your guide book. Because for now they do not speak english. But don't panic! This people are very friendly.
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China Internet & Communications  
Nanning, Guangxi Province, China
When I was in Nanning we got in early in the morning and right across from the train station there is a pretty decent hotel and some of the rooms have internet access.
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Lhasa, Tibet (Xizang Autonomous Region), China
Phuntsok Khasang International Youth Hostel - Exellent view to Potala palace, 3 minutes waking to johkang square!
Don't take the dormitory, dormitories are too cold and the showers are pretty bad, take a private room decorate in Japanese style very comfortable and not expensive.
With a panoramic restaurant, fantastically decorated in Tibetan style and amazing view to Potala Palace they serve you delicious Tibetan food, there are 6 Pc's with fast internet and Tibetan chill out music all day long. This is the place to be if you are stuck at the hostel on the cold nights.

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Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
In march 2007, I was in The Loft in Chengdu. I was on my way to the south but ended up staying here for 2,5 weeks. Nice hostel, very friendly and helpfull staff, good restaurant, excellent services. On the topfloor there was a good pooltable, free internet, tv/dvd/ps2.
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
Go to the Lee Family Restaurant in one of the Hutong's. You need to make a reservation about 2 -3 weeks in advance but its marvelous imperial food. Local name is Li Jai Cai, 11 Yangfang Hutong, deshengmen wai hutong, Beijing telephone #86-106-618-0107
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
In 2008, I decided I would travel to Mongolia. To get there, I decided to travel though Beijing. All of the travel sites recommended getting a transit visa. I thought that odd since I was only flying into Beijing and out the same airport. Because we lived in Washington, DC, I sent my wife down to the Chinese Embassy for the visa, and she came back saying the Embassy told her I didn't need one. I looked on the internet and discovered that the new terminal 3 (the largest in the world) was so far from terminal 2 that you had to go through customs. But, I also found out that you could go through customs without a visa, if you had a ticket out-bound, going within 24 hours. So I went to Beijing without a transit visa. At the Beijing airport, I asked how to get to my airline terminal to Mongolia, and the clerk checked his computer and announced -- "Sir, your flight has been cancelled." Fortunately, this was a temporary problem. I was going to be waiting the now cancelled flight for 7 hours, but there was another flight in an additional 5 hours later. I got the ticket and went through customs.
As I went through customs, I discovered a young lady from Venezuela (living in Miami waiting for regime change). She had also been scheduled for the now cancelled flight. So we began hanging aground together, watching each other’s luggage and so forth. Finally we wandered up to the internet cafe, and discovered we could surf all night and swill down all the green tea we wanted for $13 -- so we started surfing and swilling. I read the news and started reading my personal E-mail. One E-mail was from the US Embassy in Mongolia. I don't normally get E-mail like this, so I read it right away. I ran something like this -- " People are rioting in the streets, people are being shot and killed, buildings are being burnt. A curfew has been declared until 1000 tomorrow morning. Thank you for your interest in Mongolian tourism." I forwarded this E-mail to my tour company in the US and in Mongolia, and explained that my flight into the country had been delayed until 0400 tomorrow morning. I know they got it because I received a reply that inquired: "You mean 4am tomorrow?" I assured them I meant I was coming in at that time.
Now it occurred to me that maybe the flight that was cancelled, was cancelled because of the riots. The next flight might also be cancelled. But even if it came in, would the Mongolian airport stay open – and, even if open could my tour company pick me up and get me to my hotel? My hotel was the best hotel in Ulaanbaatar, the capitol of Mongolia. It had been built in Communist times for visitors from Moscow. The old Communist Party headquarters was right next door, and that was the building now on fire. If I got the hotel, would I suffer from smoke-inhalation ?

In fact, the plane arrived on time, and we landed at Ulaanbaatar, where my tour company did pick me up and they arranged for a different hotel, a few blocks away from the riots. As I got to that hotel, the sun was just coming up, so I did breakfast – but then wondered what to do during the curfew – you don’t want to go to sleep – although it had been about 36 hours since my last good sleep – I’d mess-up my circadian rhythm. So, I decided that I would break the curfew.
There were two museums downtown that I wanted to see, both just off the Mongolian version of Red Square. As I had come into town, it was raining, and I knew there are no riots in the rain. So I walked up to the Square. The old Communist Party headquarters was also just off the Square, and still smoldering. But it was just me and the police out on the streets. They took one look at me and decided I was not the problem. I checked the posted opening times for both museums, and found that one was to open at 0900, and the other at 0930. As it was still raining, I parked myself under the overhang of the museum that opened at 0900, and waited to see if it would open on time – since the curfew was until 1000.

While I waited, all the police in the world, dressed in riot gear, were forming up in front of the museum, many seeking the same overhang space I was using. They looked at me, and I looked at them. Then I noticed something. They were dressed in the same Black Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) trousers that I was wearing. They might have thought I was one of them (kind-of). Sure I don’t look Mongolian, but I could have looked like a visiting policeman. It turns out, the museum was being used as the police headquarters for controlling the riot.

I waited under the overhang, during the rain, waiting for the museum to open, either at 0900 as posted, or at the end of the 1000 curfew. The museum opened at 0900, as posted and an hour before the end of the curfew. I was their only customer, and it was the cleaning lady and me going through the exhibits. Life is good.

This had to be one of the best riots I ever attended.
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China Photography  
Kashi, Xinjiang Yughur Autonomous Region, China
It's worth paying the extra yuan to take a taxi from Kashgar out to Karakul Lake, which is found by the Karakoram Highway in Xinjiang Province, China, instead of the public bus. The road through the Pamir Mountains is spectacular and you will then be able to stop and take photos. Make sure you let the driver know you intend to do this, otherwise he might get very grumpy. Ask him to drop you off a few hundred metres before the entrance gate to avoid paying the ridiculous entrance fee. It's worth spending the night there in a Kirghiz yurt, as the ever changing light on the lake is simply mesmerising! You can hire horses to go around the lake.
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
If you are a light-haired westerner, do not be surprised if Chinese locals come up asking to have a photo taken with you! I am blonde and was asked to pose with families, children, infants, and individuals quite often. I found that people wanted the most photos around the Tianamen Square area.
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
Do not buy the photo books inside the forbidden city. Once get out the forbidden city, you can get the bargains.
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Hekou, Yunnan Province, China
I think the most dramatic border crossing (no troubles really just as far as contrast from one side to the other) that I have ever been through. I can't get over how different Vietnam and China are just by crossing an invisible line. Hekou is a nice enough town to walk around. There is a little supermarket, some parks and restaurants so you won't go hungry. We took an overnight bus to Kunming. The landscape on the bus trip was beautiful. There is a grumpy border gaurd going into China. He yelled at me and said it wasn't me in my passport. Called my photo fat (even though I have always been skinny.) Then the other lady working there yelled at him and then he let me through. So I think he does that to everyone. Apparently he yelled at the person I was with because he said "Ni-how" (don't know how to spell it) but it means hello in Chinese. he said- "If you don't speak Chinese fluently don't speak it at all." Grouchy...
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Kaqung, Xinjiang Yughur Autonomous Region, China
On s'est retrouvé là par le plus grand des hasards, un peu égaré. On a du y passer la journée, en attendant qu'un bus nous ramène sur Karghilik. Aucun regret! On a pu se promener dans ce petit village ouighour et autour, on a pu monter des collines salées, avoir vue sur le village/oasis, et surtout prendre en photos des dizaines et des dizaines de gamins ouighours qui se sont jetés sur nous pour qu'on les prenne en photos! J'espère qu'ils ont reçu ce qu'on leur a envoyé... Une journée super sympa! Très beau souvenir.
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China Visas & Permits 
Dalian, Fujian Province, China
When most Australians go to live abroad for the first time, they usually take the "safe" option and go to the UK. If they are feeling extra adventurous, maybe they'll go to America or Canada. My best friend and I decided to go to Dalian, China, and I have no doubt in my mind that it was the best experience of my life. When Chinese people refer to Dalian, they allude to one catch-phrase - "Dalian is a beautiful city," or "the pearl of the orient." While the beaches don't have the pristine sands of Western Australia, or the magnificent skyline of Melbourne, Dalian is undoubtedly one of the nicer cities of China. Dalian is one of the smaller Chinese cities with only a population of about 6.2 million(yes this is small), but only has and urban population of about 3 million including a developmental zone. Dalian governs the entire Liaodong Peninsula of North-East China, while mountains surround the northern end of the city, which makes for many-a lovely hiking trip through the mountains and surrounding townships. As Dalian is a seaside city, there are also plently of opportunities for strolls along the coast when weather permits. As with most of China, there is also plenty to do and costs were minimal. As an English teacher, I was able to live on about 500RMB per week(about $70US) and this included eatling out every night, and having an active social life. Having travelled in most provicences of China, Dalian definitely had the best food, as unlike the rest of China, it food was niether sweet or laden with MSG. For $1 US, you could enjoy a tasty Chinese BBQ with lamb sticks and Corn bread, before heading out for an evening of drinking and playing Jenga or connect 4 at Noahs Ark or Dave's Bar. In the summer, Dalian comes alive in it's many paks and squares where you can join in with the locals and play Hacky Sack(with a feathered ball thing), or a version of Duck Duck Goose they play where someone walks around everyone who are standing in a circle and drops the hankey behind you before being chased (sadly I got caught and ended up having to stand in the middle with the other losers singing "We Will Rock You". In Zhongshan Square, in the city, they also do dancing. In our mis-guided attempts however to learn the steps, we ended up leading the locals in dancing the "Nutbush" to their music! Don't get me wrong, Dalian had it's drawbacks. Hygiene in retaurants, a hole in the ground for a toilet, the beaches had pebbles instead of sand, and communicating and accepting the beuracracy of their customs was often frustrating -as you would expect, but overall, Dalian was a fabulous experience, and I highly recommend it.
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(+3)
Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China
Be prepared for long border crossings between Hong Kong and Shenzhen! Once you're through, the giant mall near customs is a great place to have clothes custom tailored. Within the mall, you may be approached by various females asking you to eat at "their restaurant". Those are usually pricier than normal, so pick and choose your own instead!
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(0)
Erenhot, Inner Mongolia, China
ERENHOT (or Erlian called by the Chinese) A small town on a chinese-mongolian border. If you are travelling on a trans-mongolian train you have to spend few hours there (customs and changing engine), and there is not much to do... You can get a chinese foot massage, buy some staff from a duty free shop, or just hang out with fellow travellers...
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Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China
Are you visiting Hong Kong? Do you want to spend one shopping day in China at the other side of the border? Then you must go to Shenzhen where you'll find A-class copies of clothes. Visa, Mastercard, American Express accepted ;-)
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Beijing, Beijing Province, China
The police harassed me every time I walked from the center to the bookstore through Tiananmen square - they would stop me and ask a bunch of questions, such as "what is your religion?" because I was a white guy... I speak fluent Chinese, so I responded that I did not have one - they then asked what I thought about Falun Gong to which I responded I never think about those zombies doing yoga outside the consulate in NY. They noticed my Taiwanese visa and asked what I thought of Taiwan - my answer was always "In Taiwan noone stops you on the street to ask what is your religion!" - I laughed when I said it and they let me go, but Beijing feels really like a police state compared to the more outlying areas of China which are almost pure anarchical capitalism everywhere, which is awesome, but I advise staying away from Beijing and Shanghai which are not very interesting and very much less fun than the smaller cities...
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Costs in China 
Dalian, Fujian Province, China
When most Australians go to live abroad for the first time, they usually take the "safe" option and go to the UK. If they are feeling extra adventurous, maybe they'll go to America or Canada. My best friend and I decided to go to Dalian, China, and I have no doubt in my mind that it was the best experience of my life. When Chinese people refer to Dalian, they allude to one catch-phrase - "Dalian is a beautiful city," or "the pearl of the orient." While the beaches don't have the pristine sands of Western Australia, or the magnificent skyline of Melbourne, Dalian is undoubtedly one of the nicer cities of China. Dalian is one of the smaller Chinese cities with only a population of about 6.2 million(yes this is small), but only has and urban population of about 3 million including a developmental zone. Dalian governs the entire Liaodong Peninsula of North-East China, while mountains surround the northern end of the city, which makes for many-a lovely hiking trip through the mountains and surrounding townships. As Dalian is a seaside city, there are also plently of opportunities for strolls along the coast when weather permits. As with most of China, there is also plenty to do and costs were minimal. As an English teacher, I was able to live on about 500RMB per week(about $70US) and this included eatling out every night, and having an active social life. Having travelled in most provicences of China, Dalian definitely had the best food, as unlike the rest of China, it food was niether sweet or laden with MSG. For $1 US, you could enjoy a tasty Chinese BBQ with lamb sticks and Corn bread, before heading out for an evening of drinking and playing Jenga or connect 4 at Noahs Ark or Dave's Bar. In the summer, Dalian comes alive in it's many paks and squares where you can join in with the locals and play Hacky Sack(with a feathered ball thing), or a version of Duck Duck Goose they play where someone walks around everyone who are standing in a circle and drops the hankey behind you before being chased (sadly I got caught and ended up having to stand in the middle with the other losers singing "We Will Rock You". In Zhongshan Square, in the city, they also do dancing. In our mis-guided attempts however to learn the steps, we ended up leading the locals in dancing the "Nutbush" to their music! Don't get me wrong, Dalian had it's drawbacks. Hygiene in retaurants, a hole in the ground for a toilet, the beaches had pebbles instead of sand, and communicating and accepting the beuracracy of their customs was often frustrating -as you would expect, but overall, Dalian was a fabulous experience, and I highly recommend it.
Good tip?
(+3)
Beijing, Beijing Province, China
Always carry a card with the name of your destination and name of your hotel written in Chinese to show taxi drivers. Almost none of them will speak English.
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(+2)
Beijing, Beijing Province, China
You gotta see the Forbidden City and venture out to see the Great Wall. It might be better now, but when I was there 5 years ago nobody spoke any English and everyone wanted to take pictures of us cause we looked so different. It can be a bit off putting at the start but you find out that the locals are really friendly. I recoomend finding an English speaking local tour guide and get them to introduce you to people. After that it's great!
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(+2)
Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China
The West Lake came from a shallow bay in ancient times where Qiantang River ran into the sea. It was formerly named as Wulin Water Golden Buffalo Lake, Qiantang Lake and Xizi Lake. As it lies in the west of Hangzhou, it was later named the West Lake. It covers an area of 6.6KM2, the average depth being 2.27M and the deepest being 5M. It has mountain on three sides and the city on the remaining one side.The Lake and mountain are magnificent. Centered on the West Lake Scenic Area is a national scenic area with a total area of 59KM2.
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(+2)
Beijing, Beijing Province, China
Always barter, unless in a proper shop. A great way to get the price you want is to show them the money you want to pay. Money talks
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(+1)