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Havana is the capital of Cuba and is a large city of over 2 million people, making it the largest in the Caribbean and far bigger than many of the Caribbean countries.

Havana Vieja (Old Havana) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that contains many beautiful 16th-18th century colonial buildings.  The narrow streets are interesting to walk through, and the lack of maintenance adds a certain ramshackle charm to many of the buildings (although that's not good for their long term health).

One can also walk along the Malecon and enjoy the impressive views of the bay, or visit rum and cigar factories. Havana has an impressive nightlife and street scene, with lots of live music and opportunities to do the rumba.
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Travel Tips from people who've been to Havana
Apurva
256
85
572

Havana... where does one start and where does one end... perhaps at the Malecon, the sea-front of Cuba with its wind-swept air... but there is so much to see and do and experience in Havana... first go to the Partagas and the Romeo y Julieta cigar factories (both are open and closed on somewhat different days) and get yourself acquainted with this most Cuban of things... buy yourself a few (Romeo and Juliet, Cohiba and Monte Cristo are good), though its much better to buy it through a local Cuban... perhaps your host if you are staying with a family (highly recommended) as it is significantly cheaper ... then enjoy them over a Mojito at one of the many cocktail bars in Havana...perhaps that colourful one full of graffiti and postcards that Ernest Hemingway used to frequent... also visit Hemingway's room at the hotel Ambos Mundos where he stayed and wrote for quite a while ... the room is still maintained as it is with some of his belongings displayed... of course, the Museo Revolucion is unmissable... go there to get a full rundown on the revolution, Fidel Castro, Che, Batista, and the lot...it has interesting artefacts, letters, photographs and other paraphernalia...as you come out of it, there are the quaintest cars parked in front (not that there is any shortage of quaint vintage cars in Havana or Cuba)... but these are taxis, so take a ride...go to the impressive Presidential Palace too and to the Habana Libre for more of history...but don't miss the non-serious stuff too ... like feasting on ice-cream at Coppelia (an institution for local Cubans), dancing or learning salsa or tango at one of the local bars, and listening to Cuban bands playing at one of the many outside or inside restaurants and bars all over Havana ... while you engage in the serious business of downing Mojitos and chomping on your cigar or cigarillo ...

 

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David
9
18
118
This is the end stop on the travel bus route through provinces in Cuba.  The people here are the best in hospitality ONCE THEY KNOW YOU and the business you are here for.  But they are definitely NOT as friendly here as in Santiago or as in smaller towns.  I didn't know much Spanish and was still treated rightly.  Most of the citizens who befriended me spoke flawless English!TIPS:Know Spanish!Stay with friends.Carry toilet paper!DO NOT take pictures of soldiers, or those who you haven't asked permission.Buy no more than three boxes of cigars.  Avoid ANY illegal activity or you'll stay longer than you wish.  See the Hemmingway House if you can and sneak some pictures or you will be charged about $200 for the privilege.  You MUST see the Plaza of the Revolucion and take the elevator to the top.  WALK the Malecon rather than drive.  The Deauville the the best hotel for value and view (if you can get a room facing Havana Harbor).  I made the mistake of aiming an expensive video camera towards the North during a rally.  When I realized that this was a jumping-off place for refugees to the U.S. I understood the big deal the police made of my shots.  The churches are beautiful and somewhat preserved since the religious ban lifted in 1993/94, so these are also great cultural places to photograph.  You must see the capital which is fashioned after the U.S. Congress building.  El Morro will encompass your entire day so bring WATER or you'll be charged an  exorbitant fee to refresh yourself.
TIP:
Dress down, look/act Cuban and you can get around on their public transportation for pennies.  Wear no socks and carry no watch.  
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Apurva
256
85
572
Havana... where does one start and where does one end... perhaps at the Malecon, the sea-front of Cuba with its wind-swept air... but there is so much to see and do and experience in Havana... first go to the Partagas and the Romeo y Julieta cigar factories (both are open and closed on somewhat different days) and get yourself acquainted with this most Cuban of things... buy yourself a few (Romeo and Juliet, Cohiba and Monte Cristo are good), though its much better to buy it through a local Cuban... perhaps your host if you are staying with a family (highly recommended) as it is significantly cheaper ... then enjoy them over a Mojito at one of the many cocktail bars in Havana...perhaps that colourful one full of graffiti and postcards that Ernest Hemingway used to frequent... also visit Hemingway's room at the hotel Ambos Mundos where he stayed and wrote for quite a while ... the room is still maintained as it is with some of his belongings displayed... of course, the Museo Revolucion is unmissable... go there to get a full rundown on the revolution, Fidel Castro, Che, Batista, and the lot...it has interesting artefacts, letters, photographs and other paraphernalia...as you come out of it, there are the quaintest cars parked in front (not that there is any shortage of quaint vintage cars in Havana or Cuba)... but these are taxis, so take a ride...go to the impressive Presidential Palace too and to the Habana Libre for more of history...but don't miss the non-serious stuff too ... like feasting on ice-cream at Coppelia (an institution for local Cubans), dancing or learning salsa or tango at one of the local bars, and listening to Cuban bands playing at one of the many outside or inside restaurants and bars all over Havana ... while you engage in the serious business of downing Mojitos and chomping on your cigar or cigarillo ...
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Recent Updates for Havana
Some O. answered João Victor G.'s question:
11 mons ago
What should I know b4 going to Cuba (More)
Some O. answered João Victor G.'s question:
11 mons ago
What should I know b4 going to Cuba (More)
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