Planning a Trip to Czech Republic

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Best Time to Visit Czech Republic 
Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
If you plan to be in Prague in early summer, ahead of time, try find out about the performing arts festival with visiting troupes and groups from all over Europe and the Czech Republic. It is a time when this wonderful city seems even more magical than ever. We saw several performances (tickets are available last minute for those who stumble onto the festival as we did). Among the best was an English company that performed a dramatized version of Canterbury Tales. It was a rollicking delight.
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Cesky Krumlov, South Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Beautiful and quiet city. The ancient medieval buildings have been wonderfully preserved, so walking in the city centre feels like going back in time. It's forbidden getting into the city centre by car, and that helps to the ancient atmosphere. I've spent there 2 nights and it feels it wasn't enough. Great restaurants and pubs, the best i've seen in Czech Republic.
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Karlovy Vary, West Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Three times i went to Karlovy Vary.

The best.. the ortodox church
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
One of the most enjoyable aspects of visiting Prague is that much of the compact old core is accessible on foot, with plenty of bars and cafes to provide relief along the way and an excellent public transport system on hand to ease tired limbs. The most famous square in Prague is Wenceslas Square, scene of the Velvet Revolution celebrations in 1989, though its shabby facades and dubious nightclubs are not too appealing these days. Just to the northwest is a far more cohesive and appealing public space, the Old Town Square - the throbbing heart of tourist Prague. Karluv Most (Charles Bridge)
The construction of Prague’s most famous and most photographed location was begun in 1357, as part of Charles IV’s monumental building program that included the Castle, St Vitus Cathedral and the University. All were supervised by the Swabian architect Peter Parler (although the bridge construction is now known to have been begun by Master Otto). The bridge replaced the earlier Judita (Judith) bridge, the only surviving remnant of which is the plainer of the two towers on the Malá Strana gate. The bridge itself is rather drab and it is the later statues (Jesuit additions during the Counter-Reformation), which flank the bridge, that have made it so visually stunning. The first of these (the Crucifixion ) was erected in 1657, followed soon after by the only bronze statue, that of St John of Nepomuk (who was martyred after being thrown from the bridge). Most of the other statues of the saints (carved from local sandstone by Josef Brokof and Matthias Braun) were added between 1706 and 1714 (the latest was not added until 1928). Due to pollution, most have been replaced and the originals are housed in the Lapidarium in Letná Park. Many tourists wonder about the wooden constructions at the base of the pilings on the upriver side - these protect against ice floes and logjams during the spring melt-off.

The fully pedestrianized bridge serves as a focal point for tourists. There are stalls of various artists and craftspeople lining the bridge, while buskers of all descriptions (from Dixieland jazz bands to puppeteers) provide a constant source of entertainment and often congestion. Strolling across as the sun comes down while a young violinist wafts music across the Vltava is one of the quintessential Prague experiences.

Staré Město (Old Town)

Praýský Hrad (Prague Castle)
From almost any part of Prague, the Castle , perched on the ridge in Hradčany, dominates the skyline. Entering under the Battling Titan statues, the sheer size of the complex (with three courtyards, fortifications and gardens, almost a small town in its own right) is most striking. Given the wealth of architecture, state apartments, churches, galleries and gardens, it is impossible to see everything in a single day.

Katedrála sv Víta (St Vitus Cathedral), the country’s largest church, takes up most of the third courtyard. Inspired by the Gothic cathedral at Narbonne, work commenced in 1344, but, reflecting the changing fortunes of the Czechs, was not completed until 1929. The finest of the 22 side chapels is that built to hold the relics of St Wenceslas - the gilded walls are inlaid with hundreds of semi-precious stones that frame the luminous 14th-century paintings. The overly ornate Baroque tomb of St John of Nepomuk was the work of the Jesuits intent on promoting this martyr as the Czech patron saint in opposition to Wenceslas. The Coronation Chamber displays the Bohemian crown jewels, but is only infrequently open to the public. The Crypt is the resting place of most of the Kings and Queens of Bohemia. Bazilika sv Jiří (St George’s Basilica) is a marvel of Romanesque architecture. Founded in 970, it was rebuilt in the 12th century and acquired its present Baroque façade in the 16th century. The chapel dedicated to Saint Ludmilla, the first Czech martyr, is particularly fine. Kláster sv Jiří (St George’s Convent), the oldest monastery in the country, was founded in 973 for Benedictine nuns. It now houses a remarkable collection of early Czech art, from the gothic to baroque periods.

In the Castle Gardens , the Belvedere is Prague’s finest Renaissance building. Built in the 1530s as a summerhouse for Queen Anne, it now houses a changing program of exhibitions. Zlatá Ulicka (Golden Lane), with its 16th-century houses built into the fortifications, derives its name from being the residences of the court alchemists.

Hradcanské námìstí, Prague 1
Tel: 2243 73368 or 2243 71111.
Website: www.hrad.cz or www.katedralapraha.cz (for the cathedral)
Opening hours: Daily 0900-1700 (Apr-Oct); daily 0900-1600 (Nov-May).
Admission charge (grounds free).

Staromìstské Námìstí (Old Town Square)
The 12th-century Old Town Square is the focal point for tourists. Horse-drawn carriages and vintage cars await those wishing to take a tour of the historic center. In summer, tables spill out from the restaurants, while in December, the square hosts the city’s largest Christmas Market. The center is dominated by the monumental memorial to the 14th-century religious reformer, Jan Hus. The Prague Meridian is also found here, designating kilometer zero, from which all distances in the city are measured. All of the palaces, churches and houses around the square are of major historical interest. The Gothic Staromestská Radnice (Old Town Hall) with its Astronomical Clock is a must for visitors. It strikes hourly (0900-2100), when the upper portion (dating to the early 15th century) reveals the Apostles at two windows. Beware the pickpockets who flock to the chimes as eagerly as the tourists. Just off the square, to the east, is the superb Gothic Chrám Matky Boýí Před Týnem (Tyn Church), where the tomb of the astronomer Tycho Brahe is found.

Staré Mĕsto (Old Town)

Josefov (Jewish Quarter)
Until the end of the 19th century, the area north of the Old Town Square constituted the Jewish Ghetto . Much of the area was cleared to make way for art nouveau buildings, but some of the flavor still remains. A single ticket, available from the Jewish Museum , allows admission to the ýidovnická Radnice (Jewish Town Hall), the Klausen , the Maisel , the Pinkas Synagogue and the Spanish Synagogue and the Ceremonial Hall . A separate ticket is required for the 13th-century Starovoná Synagoga (Old-New Synagogue), said to be the oldest synagogue in Europe, as well as the gallery and cemetery.

Staré Mĕsto (Old Town)

Jewish Museum
U Staré školy 1, Prague 1
Tel: 2217 11511.
Website: www.jewishmuseum.cz
Opening hours: Mon-Fri and Sun 0900-1800 (Apr-Oct); Mon-Fri and Sun 0900-1630 (Nov-Mar).
Admission charge.

Obecní Dùm (Municipal House)
The gem of art nouveau in Prague, Obecní Dùm has been fully restored, after decades of neglect. Designed by Antonin Balsánek and Osvald Polívka, all the major Czech artists made contributions during its construction (1905-10). However, even Karel Spillar’s striking mosaic and the sculptural group by Ladislav Šaloun cannot prepare the visitor for the remarkable interiors. Most spectacular of the public areas, the Lord Mayor’s Room features murals by Alfons Mucha. The restaurant, café and the Amerikanský bar were also the work of Polívka. The centerpiece of the building is the Smetana Hall , home of the Prague Symphony Orchestra and one of the major venues for concerts during the Prague Spring Festival. Guided tours are essential for visitors to see the rooms that are not open to the public.

Námìstí Republiky 5, Prague 1
Tel: 2220 02101.
Website: www.obecnidum.cz
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800 (exhibition hall); daily 0730-2300 (café).
Free admission; charge for guided tours (booking essential) and separate exhibitions.

Václavské Námestí (Wenceslas Square)
Despite its name, Wenceslas Square is really a long boulevard. It was here, in 1989, that the passive resistance culminating in the Velvet Revolution began. Today, the square is a bustling thoroughfare presenting the best and worst of post-Communist Prague - from the fashionable and expensive stores to the prostitutes and taxis controlled by organized crime rings. Nothing remains of the square’s earliest buildings, although examples of architectural styles from the last 150 years line its frontage. The lower portion is pedestrianized and contains many of Prague’s largest stores - often of more interest for their architecture than for their contents. News kiosks at the bottom end are the best place to purchase Czech and foreign-language newspapers. There are numerous arcades with winding passages (developed in the 1920s) leading to or surrounding a cinema (in almost all instances) - many are now being renovated to their original art deco splendor, chiefly to house trendy shops. The Lucerna (see Live music in Nightlife ) is undoubtedly the finest of these arcades, housing a jazz/rock concert hall, cinema, excellent café and numerous small shops.

Situated on the opposite side of Wenceslas Square, at number 25, the Grand Hotel Evropa (website: www.motylek.com/evropa ), is a major landmark of the First Republic. The Evropa’s time has not yet returned and service is still reminiscent of the Communist period. Its faded splendor is best enjoyed briefly over coffee or tea. The focal point of the upper end of the square is JV Myslbek’s monumental bronze equestrian statue of the Pomník sv Václav (St Wenceslas Memorial). The four surrounding statues are of national patron saints - Ludmilla, Procopius, Agnes and Vojtech (Adalbert).

At the top of the square stands the Národní Muzeum (National Museum). Founded in 1818, this houses the country’s oldest and largest collection of antiquities. Although the collections (dedicated to palaeontology, geology, zoology and anthropology) are primarily of interest to specialists, the building itself warrants a visit. Built in the neo-Renaissance style, the façade and interior decorations form a striking celebration of the history of the former Czechoslovakia.

Nové Město (New Town)

Národní muzeum ( National Museum )
Václavské 68, Prague 1
Tel: 2244 97111.
Website: www.nm.cz/english
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800 (May-Sep); daily 0900-1700 (Oct-Apr); closed first Tues of the month.
Admission charge; free first Monday of month.

Further Distractions:

Uměleckoprůmyslového Musea (Museum of Decorative Arts)
Only a small fraction of the museum’s holding is on display but what is there makes a mockery of fine art’s supposed elevation above applied art. The fin-de-siècle building itself is stunning. Divided into two floors, the ground floor hosts temporary exhibitions, while the top floor presents a wide range of crafts. Of particular interest and beauty are the Czech ceramics and glassware.

Ulice 17 listopadu 2, Prague 1
Tel: 2510 93135.
Website: www.knihovna.upm.cz
Opening hours: Tue 1000-1900, Wed-Sun 1000-1800.
Admission charge.

Muchovo Muzeum (Mucha Museum)
Celebrating the life of Czechoslovakia’s best-known artist, Alfons Mucha (1860-1934), this collection in the Kaunitz Palace includes many of his Paris posters, including those for performances by Sarah Bernhardt. Paintings, sketchbooks and a recreation of his Paris studio are also on display. There is a pleasant terrace café as well.

Kaunický palác, Panská 7, Prague 1
Tel: 2242 16415 (shop) or 2214 51333 (admin).
Website: www.mucha.cz
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800.
Admission charge.

Wax Museum Prague
The Wax Museum Prague has proved to be a popular attraction and has now moved from its original home to two different locations. The Melantrichová Museum features the ‘Hall of Celebrities of the 20th Century’, the ‘Gallery of Totalitarian Rulers’ and the multimedia program ‘Magical Prague’. The museum at Mostecká focuses on Czech history, including a medieval alchemical laboratory and a 19th-century street scene.

Melantrichová 5, Prague 1
Tel: 2242 29852.

Mostecká 18, Prague 1
Tel: 2575 35735.

Website: www.waxmuseumprague.cz
Opening hours: Daily 0900-2000.
Admission charge for each museum; combined ticket available.

Small and temporary museums
Prague is constantly acquiring new museums, some for the summer season only. These are often strange and extremely interesting. Visitors should look for posters or leaflets in the tourist offices. Among the best to pop in recent years are the Muzeum Komunismu ( Museum of Communism ), covering the 1948-1989 reign of Communism in the city and the Sex Machines Museum , an exposition of mechanical erotic appliances.

Museum of Communism 1948 - 89
Na přikopě 10 (first floor), Prague 1
Tel: 2242 12966.
Website: www.muzeumkomunismu.cz
Opening hours: Daily 0800-2100.
Admission charge.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Best time to go: after 3th may - its spring and its beutiful and no tourist is there.
Where to stay: book your room early. Hostels in the center are usually not available the day just before arrival. You can also stay at other hostels and take the tram or metro - but of course its better to be in the center.
Visit twice: after visiting all main attractions try other Prague's quarties. You will fine chap wine bars where you can get wine put into a bottle after cola. And other stuff not so visited but tourist so true.
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Czech Republic Tourist Information  
Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
If you're travelling low-budget you may consider staying at the Apple Hostel. Well, don't! The toilets were dirty, the showers didn't work, the sheets were covered with pubic hairs and lying on the lower bed of a bunk bed we could see blood(!) on the "mattress" (if you can call a tiny foam plastic matt a mattress) above. Seriously disgusting!
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Czech Republic Internet & Communications  
Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Jamás le hagas caso a las viejecitas localizadas en la estación de trenes, que anuncian en un inglés horrible: "Do you need for accommodation?. Si bien no me paso nada en el lugar donde me hospede, mas que encontrarme con un japones super pacheco, si debo mencionar que es muy lejos de laz zonas importantes si uno es visitante en Praga. Lo mejor es reservar por internet y por dios consiganse un mapa.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
The cheapest place where you can sleep during the summer are student's complexes. It's a bit far away from the centre, but there's direct subway line and it takes only 20 minutes to get to the Old Town. To book a room you can look for it in the internet. Good luck :)
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
if you want to check out prague's nightlife visit the club at charles bridge: it calls itself "the biggest disco in central europe" which i am pretty sure it is NOT :)
the club has several floors: one, which i would have called the 90s floor, turned out to be czech up-to-date charts music..
and on the hip hop floor in the basement two of my friends were hit upon by a czech girl who helped them to take of their shirts - she then tried to leave: with the boys' shirts..
however we had a lot of fun: beer and absinth is cheep and internet is for free!
but watch out for local girls undressing you :D
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
One of the most enjoyable aspects of visiting Prague is that much of the compact old core is accessible on foot, with plenty of bars and cafes to provide relief along the way and an excellent public transport system on hand to ease tired limbs. The most famous square in Prague is Wenceslas Square, scene of the Velvet Revolution celebrations in 1989, though its shabby facades and dubious nightclubs are not too appealing these days. Just to the northwest is a far more cohesive and appealing public space, the Old Town Square - the throbbing heart of tourist Prague. Karluv Most (Charles Bridge)
The construction of Prague’s most famous and most photographed location was begun in 1357, as part of Charles IV’s monumental building program that included the Castle, St Vitus Cathedral and the University. All were supervised by the Swabian architect Peter Parler (although the bridge construction is now known to have been begun by Master Otto). The bridge replaced the earlier Judita (Judith) bridge, the only surviving remnant of which is the plainer of the two towers on the Malá Strana gate. The bridge itself is rather drab and it is the later statues (Jesuit additions during the Counter-Reformation), which flank the bridge, that have made it so visually stunning. The first of these (the Crucifixion ) was erected in 1657, followed soon after by the only bronze statue, that of St John of Nepomuk (who was martyred after being thrown from the bridge). Most of the other statues of the saints (carved from local sandstone by Josef Brokof and Matthias Braun) were added between 1706 and 1714 (the latest was not added until 1928). Due to pollution, most have been replaced and the originals are housed in the Lapidarium in Letná Park. Many tourists wonder about the wooden constructions at the base of the pilings on the upriver side - these protect against ice floes and logjams during the spring melt-off.

The fully pedestrianized bridge serves as a focal point for tourists. There are stalls of various artists and craftspeople lining the bridge, while buskers of all descriptions (from Dixieland jazz bands to puppeteers) provide a constant source of entertainment and often congestion. Strolling across as the sun comes down while a young violinist wafts music across the Vltava is one of the quintessential Prague experiences.

Staré Město (Old Town)

Praýský Hrad (Prague Castle)
From almost any part of Prague, the Castle , perched on the ridge in Hradčany, dominates the skyline. Entering under the Battling Titan statues, the sheer size of the complex (with three courtyards, fortifications and gardens, almost a small town in its own right) is most striking. Given the wealth of architecture, state apartments, churches, galleries and gardens, it is impossible to see everything in a single day.

Katedrála sv Víta (St Vitus Cathedral), the country’s largest church, takes up most of the third courtyard. Inspired by the Gothic cathedral at Narbonne, work commenced in 1344, but, reflecting the changing fortunes of the Czechs, was not completed until 1929. The finest of the 22 side chapels is that built to hold the relics of St Wenceslas - the gilded walls are inlaid with hundreds of semi-precious stones that frame the luminous 14th-century paintings. The overly ornate Baroque tomb of St John of Nepomuk was the work of the Jesuits intent on promoting this martyr as the Czech patron saint in opposition to Wenceslas. The Coronation Chamber displays the Bohemian crown jewels, but is only infrequently open to the public. The Crypt is the resting place of most of the Kings and Queens of Bohemia. Bazilika sv Jiří (St George’s Basilica) is a marvel of Romanesque architecture. Founded in 970, it was rebuilt in the 12th century and acquired its present Baroque façade in the 16th century. The chapel dedicated to Saint Ludmilla, the first Czech martyr, is particularly fine. Kláster sv Jiří (St George’s Convent), the oldest monastery in the country, was founded in 973 for Benedictine nuns. It now houses a remarkable collection of early Czech art, from the gothic to baroque periods.

In the Castle Gardens , the Belvedere is Prague’s finest Renaissance building. Built in the 1530s as a summerhouse for Queen Anne, it now houses a changing program of exhibitions. Zlatá Ulicka (Golden Lane), with its 16th-century houses built into the fortifications, derives its name from being the residences of the court alchemists.

Hradcanské námìstí, Prague 1
Tel: 2243 73368 or 2243 71111.
Website: www.hrad.cz or www.katedralapraha.cz (for the cathedral)
Opening hours: Daily 0900-1700 (Apr-Oct); daily 0900-1600 (Nov-May).
Admission charge (grounds free).

Staromìstské Námìstí (Old Town Square)
The 12th-century Old Town Square is the focal point for tourists. Horse-drawn carriages and vintage cars await those wishing to take a tour of the historic center. In summer, tables spill out from the restaurants, while in December, the square hosts the city’s largest Christmas Market. The center is dominated by the monumental memorial to the 14th-century religious reformer, Jan Hus. The Prague Meridian is also found here, designating kilometer zero, from which all distances in the city are measured. All of the palaces, churches and houses around the square are of major historical interest. The Gothic Staromestská Radnice (Old Town Hall) with its Astronomical Clock is a must for visitors. It strikes hourly (0900-2100), when the upper portion (dating to the early 15th century) reveals the Apostles at two windows. Beware the pickpockets who flock to the chimes as eagerly as the tourists. Just off the square, to the east, is the superb Gothic Chrám Matky Boýí Před Týnem (Tyn Church), where the tomb of the astronomer Tycho Brahe is found.

Staré Mĕsto (Old Town)

Josefov (Jewish Quarter)
Until the end of the 19th century, the area north of the Old Town Square constituted the Jewish Ghetto . Much of the area was cleared to make way for art nouveau buildings, but some of the flavor still remains. A single ticket, available from the Jewish Museum , allows admission to the ýidovnická Radnice (Jewish Town Hall), the Klausen , the Maisel , the Pinkas Synagogue and the Spanish Synagogue and the Ceremonial Hall . A separate ticket is required for the 13th-century Starovoná Synagoga (Old-New Synagogue), said to be the oldest synagogue in Europe, as well as the gallery and cemetery.

Staré Mĕsto (Old Town)

Jewish Museum
U Staré školy 1, Prague 1
Tel: 2217 11511.
Website: www.jewishmuseum.cz
Opening hours: Mon-Fri and Sun 0900-1800 (Apr-Oct); Mon-Fri and Sun 0900-1630 (Nov-Mar).
Admission charge.

Obecní Dùm (Municipal House)
The gem of art nouveau in Prague, Obecní Dùm has been fully restored, after decades of neglect. Designed by Antonin Balsánek and Osvald Polívka, all the major Czech artists made contributions during its construction (1905-10). However, even Karel Spillar’s striking mosaic and the sculptural group by Ladislav Šaloun cannot prepare the visitor for the remarkable interiors. Most spectacular of the public areas, the Lord Mayor’s Room features murals by Alfons Mucha. The restaurant, café and the Amerikanský bar were also the work of Polívka. The centerpiece of the building is the Smetana Hall , home of the Prague Symphony Orchestra and one of the major venues for concerts during the Prague Spring Festival. Guided tours are essential for visitors to see the rooms that are not open to the public.

Námìstí Republiky 5, Prague 1
Tel: 2220 02101.
Website: www.obecnidum.cz
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800 (exhibition hall); daily 0730-2300 (café).
Free admission; charge for guided tours (booking essential) and separate exhibitions.

Václavské Námestí (Wenceslas Square)
Despite its name, Wenceslas Square is really a long boulevard. It was here, in 1989, that the passive resistance culminating in the Velvet Revolution began. Today, the square is a bustling thoroughfare presenting the best and worst of post-Communist Prague - from the fashionable and expensive stores to the prostitutes and taxis controlled by organized crime rings. Nothing remains of the square’s earliest buildings, although examples of architectural styles from the last 150 years line its frontage. The lower portion is pedestrianized and contains many of Prague’s largest stores - often of more interest for their architecture than for their contents. News kiosks at the bottom end are the best place to purchase Czech and foreign-language newspapers. There are numerous arcades with winding passages (developed in the 1920s) leading to or surrounding a cinema (in almost all instances) - many are now being renovated to their original art deco splendor, chiefly to house trendy shops. The Lucerna (see Live music in Nightlife ) is undoubtedly the finest of these arcades, housing a jazz/rock concert hall, cinema, excellent café and numerous small shops.

Situated on the opposite side of Wenceslas Square, at number 25, the Grand Hotel Evropa (website: www.motylek.com/evropa ), is a major landmark of the First Republic. The Evropa’s time has not yet returned and service is still reminiscent of the Communist period. Its faded splendor is best enjoyed briefly over coffee or tea. The focal point of the upper end of the square is JV Myslbek’s monumental bronze equestrian statue of the Pomník sv Václav (St Wenceslas Memorial). The four surrounding statues are of national patron saints - Ludmilla, Procopius, Agnes and Vojtech (Adalbert).

At the top of the square stands the Národní Muzeum (National Museum). Founded in 1818, this houses the country’s oldest and largest collection of antiquities. Although the collections (dedicated to palaeontology, geology, zoology and anthropology) are primarily of interest to specialists, the building itself warrants a visit. Built in the neo-Renaissance style, the façade and interior decorations form a striking celebration of the history of the former Czechoslovakia.

Nové Město (New Town)

Národní muzeum ( National Museum )
Václavské 68, Prague 1
Tel: 2244 97111.
Website: www.nm.cz/english
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800 (May-Sep); daily 0900-1700 (Oct-Apr); closed first Tues of the month.
Admission charge; free first Monday of month.

Further Distractions:

Uměleckoprůmyslového Musea (Museum of Decorative Arts)
Only a small fraction of the museum’s holding is on display but what is there makes a mockery of fine art’s supposed elevation above applied art. The fin-de-siècle building itself is stunning. Divided into two floors, the ground floor hosts temporary exhibitions, while the top floor presents a wide range of crafts. Of particular interest and beauty are the Czech ceramics and glassware.

Ulice 17 listopadu 2, Prague 1
Tel: 2510 93135.
Website: www.knihovna.upm.cz
Opening hours: Tue 1000-1900, Wed-Sun 1000-1800.
Admission charge.

Muchovo Muzeum (Mucha Museum)
Celebrating the life of Czechoslovakia’s best-known artist, Alfons Mucha (1860-1934), this collection in the Kaunitz Palace includes many of his Paris posters, including those for performances by Sarah Bernhardt. Paintings, sketchbooks and a recreation of his Paris studio are also on display. There is a pleasant terrace café as well.

Kaunický palác, Panská 7, Prague 1
Tel: 2242 16415 (shop) or 2214 51333 (admin).
Website: www.mucha.cz
Opening hours: Daily 1000-1800.
Admission charge.

Wax Museum Prague
The Wax Museum Prague has proved to be a popular attraction and has now moved from its original home to two different locations. The Melantrichová Museum features the ‘Hall of Celebrities of the 20th Century’, the ‘Gallery of Totalitarian Rulers’ and the multimedia program ‘Magical Prague’. The museum at Mostecká focuses on Czech history, including a medieval alchemical laboratory and a 19th-century street scene.

Melantrichová 5, Prague 1
Tel: 2242 29852.

Mostecká 18, Prague 1
Tel: 2575 35735.

Website: www.waxmuseumprague.cz
Opening hours: Daily 0900-2000.
Admission charge for each museum; combined ticket available.

Small and temporary museums
Prague is constantly acquiring new museums, some for the summer season only. These are often strange and extremely interesting. Visitors should look for posters or leaflets in the tourist offices. Among the best to pop in recent years are the Muzeum Komunismu ( Museum of Communism ), covering the 1948-1989 reign of Communism in the city and the Sex Machines Museum , an exposition of mechanical erotic appliances.

Museum of Communism 1948 - 89
Na přikopě 10 (first floor), Prague 1
Tel: 2242 12966.
Website: www.muzeumkomunismu.cz
Opening hours: Daily 0800-2100.
Admission charge.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
I went to a pub in Prague and they had a Rocky's ten commandments (warning notice). I thought it was a very good one, so I'm going to share it with you! ( http://www.rockyoreillys.cz/warnings.htm )1) Don't change money on the streets. It's dangerous, it's illegal and it's more than likely counterfeit money. 2) Using taxis , always agree on a price before getting in the cab. Normal fare within the city is 100-200 crowns--500-600 to the airport. Never accept "It's according to the meter." Establish a price. We are happy to call a reliable cab for you, but never simply get in a cab parked outside this bar. Never ask a cab to take you to a 'gentleman's club,' as they often get a 1,000 crown commission per patron. 3) Very friendly girls or women with multiple children, who approach you on the streets are pick-pockets , protected by 'minders." Be very careful. Don't let them 'swarm' you with kids or into an alley. They are experts and are very dangerous. 4) The metros and trams are not free . Tickets are sold at all newspaper stands . A ticket is not vald unless you franked it in the yellow box at the entrance to the metro or the several yellow boxes on board the tram. Plain-clothes 'controllers' are liable to check you for a valid ticket at any time and the fines are high . Buy a one, two, three-day or one-month pass--they are very cheap, convenient and save you from a costly 'tourist' fine. 5) Prague, like most European cities, has pick-pockets . Never leave your bags unattended or coat with wallet on the back of your chair. Particularly mind your passport. Danger spots are seats near tram or metro doors, area of the Prague Castle, Old Town Square, Wenceslas Square, busy bars, etc. Be vigilant. NEVER leave a camera or cell-phone on a table . 6) All public noise is forbidden by law in Prague. This includes singing or any excessive rowdiness or noise. You will be asked to leave the bar--if you persist, we will call the police. This holds true on the streets as well, after leaving bars. Prague police are very intolerant on this issue. 7) Vandalism, loud, aggressive or threatening behavior are all very bad ideas. Prague police take a particularly serious view of this and are not famous for their sense of humour. 8) Telephone cards: Buy only Telefonica O2 phone cards (175 crowns at all newspaper kiosks). Do NOT buy SMART CARDS . 9) Changing money: Be very cautious at change offices, as what you see advertised is not always what you get. They only advertise the rate they SELL pounds or euros. Change your money at any bank, for safety and a better rate--or-- best choice, use an ATM machine . 10) Some con artists pose as "Currency Inspectors." They will flash 'ID cards' and ask to inspect your money. NEVER DO THIS. There is NO SUCH PERSON as a currency inspector. If he persists , call for police--he will disappear immediately. )
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Czech Republic Visas & Permits 
Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
go swimming in the natural roman baths ! but don't forget to ring your swimming suit ...
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
There are a lot of cash machines, but they are very unwilling to accept VISA, even in the very touristy heart of town!
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Roznov pod Radhostem, North Moravia Region, Czech Republic
www.roznov.cz Rožnov pod Radhoštěm, having a population of almost 20 000, is a modern town surrounded by mountains. The town is annually visited by thousands of Czech and foreign visitors coming both in winter and summer. The medieval age of the founding of the town is reminded us by remains of a castle above the town. Crafts, of which the tradition has been followed by industrial plants (such as a paper-mill and knitting mills) since the 19th century, were among important sources to ensure the inhabitants‘ living. During the past 60 years, Rožnov has became an important centre of the electrical industry.
In the past, Rožnov used to be famous for its important climatic spa treating both European and oversea patients. Although the history of the climatic spa has already finished, Rožnov and its surroundings are still a frequent destination of tourists. All year round, the town itself and its surrounding offer tourists many opportunities to relax and do avocational or top-level sports. Rožnov has always been famous for its wide offer of cultural and social events. During your stay, you can visit the Valachian Open-air Museum – the oldest museum of its kind in central Europe – which not only presents the beauty of the Valachian architecture but also shows folk customs, traditional crafts, farm works and folklore.
The town of Rožnov pod Radhoštěm is simply a place which is worth living in and visiting.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Prague is an amazing place to visit and offers some awesome sights, however, please note that although it is part of the Schengen States, it does not accept Euros as currency. It has its own currency and it is advisable that you convert in Czech Ks before you arrive at Prague. You can travel on your Schengen visa though. People are very friendly but language is a serious barrier and must be kept in mind.
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Costs in Czech Republic 
Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Avoid taxicabs unless you know how much a fare should be from one place to another. Negotiate this price in advance.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Beautiful city...ignore the modern parts of the city and wander about the historic parts. Make sure you visit the old Jewish cemetery and the Castle. Christmas especially is a beautiful time to visit the city, since you have christmas markets on each square and market.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Walk around downtown and the old city. Visit the castle. Buy paintings done by local artists.
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Brno, South Moravia Region, Czech Republic
If you go there by bike, be sure NOT to drive through the pedestrian zone! Policemen there are merciless.
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Prague, Central Bohemia Region, Czech Republic
Karlovny Lazne the biggest Club in Town - near Karlsbridge
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