Egypt People & Culture

People in Egypt 
EGYPT s a country with an immense cultural mix, In every major city in Egypt you will find traditions that remain from the time of the Pharaohs , and in other parts you will find pure tribal customs that were brought in by many invaders throughout the centuries. That contradiction and contrast between areas of Egypt, when you compare it with other Middle Eastern countries, is what makes Egypt seem advanced against some of the others. Yet here you will find that the customs and mentality tends to be full of warmth towards visitors and foreigners. I guess this could be the secret why Egypt is considered the most attractive country in the region for travellers. The pure nature of the local Egyptians when they are always there when you need help, or when they invite you into their houses when they hardly know you, or when they smile in your face, makes a visit to Egypt a wonderful and unforgettable experience.

Egypt’s population is about 70 million. 57 million of them are Sunni Muslims and about 10 Million are Coptic Christians (Christian Egyptians), although public statistics indicate that they are not more than 7 million. Whether Muslim or Copt, the Egyptians are moderately religious and religious principles are quite noticeable in their daily lives. Here each family member is responsible for the integrity of his or her family and for the behaviour of other members, creating an environment that would be envied by many people in the West.  Here they are very close to each other, family ties are far stronger than in the west, and that is why you will find any major city in Egypt is a lot safer than any western metropolis.
Last edited Dec 15, 09 11:43 AM. Contributors: Contributors: Andrew W.
Alexandria, Mediterranean Coast, Egypt
Some people think Alex doesn't live up to its past. No more pharos, tomb of Alexander, or even the multi-cultured feel the place had up until the 1950s. But, there is enough of the old Alex for the place to be relaxing and charming (especially compared to Cairo). The corniche area from the Fort to the new library is lovely to walk down. The Cecil hotel in the main square still has colonial charm and there are some lovely restaurants and cafes in this area. The Roman catacombs are also worth a visit.
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
Extraordinary!!! Like travelling in another dimension! Colours, smells, sounds, people....
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
It's been a while since I was there but locals were fab. We met some really honest people who just wanted to show us their city. Enjoy a turkish coffee and a flavored smoke near the markets. Go to the citadel and be amazed at how you can feel quite alone in this crowded city. Rent a taxi for the day and visit Giza and other close Pyramids and historic areas. You can get good deals on this from some cheap hotels. For a special treat if you are backpaking pay to use the pool at the Mena House Hotel, you can see views of Gisa, this is where Churchill and Roosevelt discussed WWII so is an interesting place to spend a day. Enjoy the food and the peoplel, I loved Cairo!
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Dhahab, Sinai Region, Egypt
GO THERE! so chill and gorgeous. you also have access to amazing outdoor activities like diving, snorkeling, hiking in canyons and up mt sinai and atv-ing! the people are very kind, and there is nothing like chillin in a beahcside restauraunt with some sheesha til the wee hours!
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Sharm el-Sheikh, Sinai Region, Egypt
is suitable for people who wants just to relax. is not very reach of culture. kind of fankeness there. But very nice nature with perfect conditions for divers.
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Egypt Religion 
Egypt is predominantly Muslim, covering about 93% of the population, while Christians represent about 7% (official figures put it as low as 3%) of the population.
Of the Ancient egyptian religion  no adherents still exist. Practically all Muslims are Sunni . The Christians are mainly Copts, divided into two groups, the one having close organizational ties to the Roman catholic church. There are other small Christian groups, standard Roman Catholics, Greek orthodox, and Armenian orthodox, in Alexandria and Cairo , whose adherents are mainly descendants of Italian, Greek, and Armenian immigrants.
Last edited Jun 12, 09 2:34 AM. Contributors: Contributors: Mohammad T.
Egypt Language 
Egyptian Arabic is spoken across Egypt.  It is most beneficial to learn some Arabic before traveling to Egypt as the locals really appreciate the effort that you have made and are more helpful and less likely to hassle you.  They will gladly help you learn more.

Some useful phrases are:
No Thankyou = La Shokran
I don't want = Ahna Mish Eyes
How are you? = Issayak?
Very Good = Kwayis Owie (Kwayisa Owie for female)
How Much is that? = Bi Kam Da?
Please = Minfudluk (to male) Minfudlik (to female)
Yes = Aywah
Enough! = Hellass (use sparingly and only if necessary as it is offensive - always use with a smile and add "Minfudluk")

Pay attention to the car number plates too as they have both Arabic and English numerals on many and are a great way to learn the Arabic numbers.

Last edited Oct 27, 08 3:10 AM. Contributors: Contributors: Sharon W.
Egypt Culture 
Alexandria, Mediterranean Coast, Egypt
Some people think Alex doesn't live up to its past. No more pharos, tomb of Alexander, or even the multi-cultured feel the place had up until the 1950s. But, there is enough of the old Alex for the place to be relaxing and charming (especially compared to Cairo). The corniche area from the Fort to the new library is lovely to walk down. The Cecil hotel in the main square still has colonial charm and there are some lovely restaurants and cafes in this area. The Roman catacombs are also worth a visit.
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Aswan, Nile Valley, Egypt
Aswan, Egypt's sunniest southern city and ancient frontier town located about 81 miles south of Luxor, has a distinctively African atmosphere. Its ancient Egyptian name was Syene. Small enough to walk around and graced with the most beautiful setting on the Nile, the pace of life is slow and relaxing. Days can be spent strolling up and down the broad Corniche watching the sailboats etch the sky with their tall masts or sitting in floating restaurants listening to Nubian music and eating freshly caught fish. In Aswan the Nile is at its most beautiful, flowing through amber desert and granite rocks, round emerald islands covered in palm groves and tropical plants. Explore the souk, full of the scent and color of spices, perfumes, scarves and baskets. View the spectacular sunsets while having tea on the terrace of the Old Cataract Hotel (Named due to the location of the Nile's first cataract located here). Aswan has been a favorite winter resort since the beginning of the nineteenth century, and it's still a perfect place to get away from it all. Every night Nubian dancers and musicians perform in the Cultural Center, just off the Corniche. Folklore troupes recreate scenes from village life and perform the famous Nubian mock stick-fight dances.
Dancers at the Cultural Center Aswan is a strategic location which currently houses a garrison of the Egyptian army, but which has also seen ancient Egyptian garrisons, as well as that of General Kitchener, Turkish troops of the Ottoman empire and the Romans. The city proper lies on the east bank of the Nile. Relax here, visit a few mosques, but then prepare for an adventure. The bazaar runs along the Corniche, which continues past the Ferial Gardens and the Nubian Museum, and continues on to the Cemetery, with its forest of cupolas surmounted tombs from the Fatimid period. Just east of the cemetery in the famous area quarries is the gigantic Unfinished Obelisk . Just to the south of this, two Graeco-Roman sarcophagi and an unfinished colossus remain half buried in the sand. The most obvious is Elephantine Island , which is timeless with artifacts dating from pre-Dynastic times onward. It is the largest island in the area. Just beyond Elephantine is Kitchener's Island (Geziret el-Nabatat). It was named for the British general Haratio Kitchener (185--1916) and was sent to Egypt in 1883 to reorganize the Egyptian army, which he then led against the Sudanese Mahdi. But the island is known for its garden and the exotic plants the Kitchener planted there, and which continue to flourish today. On the opposite shore (west bank), the cliffs are surmounted by the tomb of a marabut, Qubbet el-Hawwa, who was a local saint. Below are tombs of the local (pharaonic) nobles and dignitaries. Upriver a bit is the tomb of Mohammed Shah Aga Khan who died in 1957. Known as the Tomb of the Aga Khan , it is beautiful in its simplicity. A road from there leads back to the Coptic Monastery of St Simeon , which was built in the sixth century in honor of Amba Hadra, a local saint. Just up river a bit, there is also the old Aswan dam, built by the British, which was enlarged, expanded, but unable to control the Nile for irrigation.
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Egypt
Culturally, Egypt is a Muslin country. Even in Cairo, a woman ought to have a male companion walking by her side when on the street. She should have shoulders and upper arms covered, closed neck top, skirt below the knees. Pants are ok, but ought to be loose. Modesty is the key word. WEAR A WEDDING BAND, even if you are not married. Avoid being harassed and being an "ugly American" by dressing properly, speaking deferentially, and making sure to engage in small talk before going into the business at hand. Please don't complain when you are not allowed into places or do activities because of your female gender. Do not insist on your "rights" or be aggressive. Ask for assistance. The men are protective of women and eager to help. It is a different culture, and their customs ought to be respected.
That doesn't mean you can't negotiate for a good price, but always very politely.
Do not go out at night alone.
Book your tour before arriving in Egypt.
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
very nice, very dynamic, very cultural
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
A busy place, really lets you experiance the culture. Pyramids, Museums are definatly a must.
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Egypt Arts & Recreation 
Aswan, Nile Valley, Egypt
Aswan, Egypt's sunniest southern city and ancient frontier town located about 81 miles south of Luxor, has a distinctively African atmosphere. Its ancient Egyptian name was Syene. Small enough to walk around and graced with the most beautiful setting on the Nile, the pace of life is slow and relaxing. Days can be spent strolling up and down the broad Corniche watching the sailboats etch the sky with their tall masts or sitting in floating restaurants listening to Nubian music and eating freshly caught fish. In Aswan the Nile is at its most beautiful, flowing through amber desert and granite rocks, round emerald islands covered in palm groves and tropical plants. Explore the souk, full of the scent and color of spices, perfumes, scarves and baskets. View the spectacular sunsets while having tea on the terrace of the Old Cataract Hotel (Named due to the location of the Nile's first cataract located here). Aswan has been a favorite winter resort since the beginning of the nineteenth century, and it's still a perfect place to get away from it all. Every night Nubian dancers and musicians perform in the Cultural Center, just off the Corniche. Folklore troupes recreate scenes from village life and perform the famous Nubian mock stick-fight dances.
Dancers at the Cultural Center Aswan is a strategic location which currently houses a garrison of the Egyptian army, but which has also seen ancient Egyptian garrisons, as well as that of General Kitchener, Turkish troops of the Ottoman empire and the Romans. The city proper lies on the east bank of the Nile. Relax here, visit a few mosques, but then prepare for an adventure. The bazaar runs along the Corniche, which continues past the Ferial Gardens and the Nubian Museum, and continues on to the Cemetery, with its forest of cupolas surmounted tombs from the Fatimid period. Just east of the cemetery in the famous area quarries is the gigantic Unfinished Obelisk . Just to the south of this, two Graeco-Roman sarcophagi and an unfinished colossus remain half buried in the sand. The most obvious is Elephantine Island , which is timeless with artifacts dating from pre-Dynastic times onward. It is the largest island in the area. Just beyond Elephantine is Kitchener's Island (Geziret el-Nabatat). It was named for the British general Haratio Kitchener (185--1916) and was sent to Egypt in 1883 to reorganize the Egyptian army, which he then led against the Sudanese Mahdi. But the island is known for its garden and the exotic plants the Kitchener planted there, and which continue to flourish today. On the opposite shore (west bank), the cliffs are surmounted by the tomb of a marabut, Qubbet el-Hawwa, who was a local saint. Below are tombs of the local (pharaonic) nobles and dignitaries. Upriver a bit is the tomb of Mohammed Shah Aga Khan who died in 1957. Known as the Tomb of the Aga Khan , it is beautiful in its simplicity. A road from there leads back to the Coptic Monastery of St Simeon , which was built in the sixth century in honor of Amba Hadra, a local saint. Just up river a bit, there is also the old Aswan dam, built by the British, which was enlarged, expanded, but unable to control the Nile for irrigation.
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Al Uqsur, Nile Valley, Egypt
The Colossi of Memnon are situated on the main road to the West Bank monument area. All tourist's groups have here stop for some minutes - so, you can take photos! These two gigantic statues (around 17m high) were cut from two massive granite blocks, brought from quarries near Cairo. And once they stood at the entrance gate of the mortuary temple of Amenhotep III. Nowadays almost nothing remains about this temple of Amenhotep III. Statues represents the pharaoh Amenhotep III (Dynasty XVIII). There are very interesting story - after an earthquake in 27 BC, part of the northern colossus collapsed and from then on each morning at sunrise, the statue produced a strange musical sound. Ancient :-) Greek and Roman tourists :-) came to hear this sound, and gave statue the name of "Memnon" - a Trojan hero, the son of Eos and Titan, who sang to his mother each morning at daybreak. It's a legend, but in reality the sun heating up the stone produced this strange sound. In the third century AD northern statue was repaired and the mysterious singing was never heard again. But as a result of the legend the statues of Amenhotep III became known as the Colossi of Memnon. There is no entrance charge or restrictions on photography.
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
Cairo, Egypt, the Triumphant City, known officially as al-Qāhirah is one of the world's largest urban areas and offers many sites to see. It is the administrative capital of Egypt and, close by, is almost every Egypt Pyramid, such as the Great Pyramids of Giza on the very edge of the city. But there are also ancient temples, tombs, Christian churches, magnificent Muslim monuments, and of course, the Egyptian Antiquities Museum all either within or nearby the city.
Cairo, Egypt is an amazing city full of life and movement, and it is that way almost 24 hours every day, with the noisy honking of horns, children playing in the streets and merchants selling their wears and services. And here, the Egyptians are most at home in this powerful, modern and ancient city

Cairo, Egypt provides great culture, including art galleries and music halls, such as the Cairo Opera House, as well it should, being one of the largest cities in the world. It also provides some of the grandest accommodations and restaurants in the world, such as the Four Seasons and the Cairo Marriott.

Cairo offers an incredible selection of shopping, leisure and nightlife activities. Shopping ranges from the famous Khan el-Khalili souk, (or bazaar) largely unchanged since the 14th century, to modern air-conditioned centers displaying the latest fashions. All the bounty of the East can be here. Particularly good buys are spices, perfumes, gold, silver, carpets, brass and copperware, leatherwork, glass, ceramics and mashrabiya. Try some of the famous street markets, like Wekala al-Balaq, for fabrics, including Egyptian cotton, the Tentmakers Bazaar for appliqué-work, Mohammed Ali Street for musical instruments and, although you probably won't want to buy, the Camel Market makes a fascinating trip. This is, and has been for over a thousand years, truly a shopper's paradise.

If you want more information please go to

http://www.cairotourist.com







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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
I’ve travelled a lot around the world – my country counter is now over 30. One thing I’ve noticed throughout my travels is that the quality of driving around the world varies considerably. I’ve devised my own award for the worst offenders – the Juan Manuel Fangio Award for Outstanding Defensive Driving . Let me explain. Case Study Number One: Italian Drivers I have a theory that the amount of religious paraphernalia on a car’s rear view mirror is a reliable indication of how crap the drivers are. The more crucifixes, rosary beads, or evil eyes wrapped around the mirror, the more dangerous the driving is. I first tested this theory in Italy . By heritage, I am half Sicilian (on my mother’s side) and half Northern Italian (my old man’s side). A recent visit to Italia was a home-coming of sorts for me, even though I had never been here before in a physical sense. However, my first encounter with my Italian heritage was to be – the traffic. The city of Rome was my first exposure to the chaotic Latino driving that was the bane of the Italian stereotype; however, there was no myth to bust – the drivers are completely bonkers. The roads are an extension of the Monza Formula One race track. Collisions result from a reckless apathy for general traffic laws and probably from gawking at gorgeous women walking down the street. Merging is a competition, not a mutual effort; road signs and traffic lights are merely ornamentation. Moped riders manoeuvre in ways that I would not attempt on a Play Station. Drivers will tailgate, wildly waving their hands as if to signify an emergency – as if there is always a pregnant woman about to deliver a baby that would spoil the immaculately-kept interior of the Fiat, that was probably about to fall apart from poor build quality. I thought maybe Italians were fearful of being late for the latest christening, hot date or lunch at mama and papas. I concluded that they simply enjoyed dicing with death for kicks. Italy ’s rating on the Crazy Driver Index (out of 10) – 7. Case Study Number Two: Egyptian Taxis Here is some great advice – one should refuse to enter a Cairo taxi, even if one really needs to. I learnt this fact the hard way within a day of arriving in Cairo . The essential activity of trying to see the city unfortunately necessitated the use of unregistered and barely-roadworthy vehicles to complete this task successfully. I’m not sure what side of the road these taxis drive on, because they use the ENTIRE road. From this harrowing experience, I have devised my own facts about Cairo taxis: My previous stated theory that high volumes of religious paraphernalia decorating a rear view mirror directly relates to the driver’s recklessness was indeed confirmed once again – Egyptian taxis seemed to have enough evil eyes and prayer beads to reduce the car’s centre of gravity below the potholed tarmac; A high number of car dents or bent panels is an indication that someone of a higher plane is looking after the taxi driver; It is a lineball decision to leave ones’ nose inside or outside of the taxi – your nose will be wiped out by either a collision with another taxi, or by the drivers’ nose hair-singing body odour; Seat belts are optional, unworkable or not available; Pedestrians must give way to taxis at all times and locations, even at zebra crossings and when the green-man light is on; and The seemingly trance-like and repetitive term of ‘Am-shallah’ (god willing) will suffice as an insurance policy. Egypt ’s rating on the Crazy Driver Index (out of 10) – 9.5. Case Study Number Three: Minibus Taxis in Southern Africa My favourite! Ever tried to work out the logic of waiting four hours for a minibus taxi ride until it's full, for it to blast onto a neglected highway system at 140 km/hour for an 11 hour journey to Johannesburg , South Africa , sitting next to a person with the biggest backside in the world? During a trip to Zimbabwe in 2002, I arrived at Bulawayo Train Station at eight o’clock on a Sunday morning after an overnight trip from Victoria Falls . I wandered around the grimy streets of Bulawayo asking for the presence of the bus station. After discovering that none of the bus offices were open that day, it frightfully dawned on me that there was only one option to return to South Africa that day – the dreaded mini-bus taxi. I had previously seen the mini-bus taxis everywhere in Africa , but never had the privilege of being transported within one. Mini-bus taxis in Africa seem to work on the principle of not leaving the car park until they are full, to maximise the income gained per seat per trip. This wait may last from four minutes to four hours, or possibly even four days - which is probably insignificant in African time terms. I proceeded to the local car park where the mini-bus taxis were collected, all neatly arranged like a miniature Matchbox collection. There were about 10 mini-buses herded into the car park, waiting for silly punters like myself willing to risk their lives for the sake of travelling from Point A to Point B, or maybe to Point Gravesite. I had heard all sorts of horror stories about these taxis in South Africa – the vast majority of them are clapped-out pieces of corrosion that would not pass a roadworthy at a demolition derby. The best story was one where a driver had replaced the aged and worn steering-wheel by attaching two plumbing wrenches on the steering column to ensure maximum manoeuvrability around the numerous potholes that probably almost matched the area of road. However, this was my (relatively) lucky day. After the driver had graciously accepted my money, I only had to wait for a grand total of four hours for the mini-bus to depart the Bulawayo bitumen. I hung around, taking the mandatory siesta and sometimes chewed on a non-descript snack from the nearby corner store that emblazoned a sign stating crazy Cairo was 3500 miles away from this point. A steady trickle of people would arrive at the driver’s side of the mini-bus to pay their money and use their luggage as a makeshift bed, like I did, while waiting for the signal to leave. At midday, the mini-bus had reached its quota (that is, three times the legal carrying capacity of the vehicle) and everyone piled their luggage in the trailer. The mini-bus left the car park and it was from this point that I was abruptly introduced to the rather absurd four/one forty rule – waiting four hours for the mini-bus to fill up in the car park, only for this lost time to be compensated by screaming along the woefully under-resourced Zimbabwean Highway system at the top speed of 140 kilometres per hour all the way back to South Africa. How the mini-bus managed this considering the dire fuel shortages and without falling apart, I will never know. I concluded that Africa does not need a Formula One Grand Prix as there is enough high speed action on its highways. My brain had selected an obscure Hoodoo Gurus song to play during the attempt to break the land speed record – called I Was a Kamikaze Pilot from one of my favourite Hoodoos albums, Stoneage Romeos. I was a, was a kamikaze pilot They gave me a plane – I couldn’t fly it home. Taught how to take off, I don’t know how to land. They say it doesn’t matter and I just cannot understand. I was a kamikaze pilot, They gave me a plane – I couldn’t fly it home. The mini-bus taxi may as well have been a suicidal Mitsubishi Zero, ready to honourably take out a pylon of a precisely targeted overpass. What had added to the mini-bus thrill theme ride was that I had miserably lost the dreadful game of mini-bus musical chairs – I had managed to pick the seat next to the person with the largest arse on the mini-bus, and possibly, southern Africa. She was a large, dark woman who wore a colourful headscarf and seemed friendly enough. She did not communicate with me in words – but instead with various facial expressions. She tried her best to make room for me from her window seat, but when combined with my arse, it was inevitable that one of my butt cheeks would pathetically lose out. My right butt cheek was not prepared to overhang the seat for the 11 hour trip back to South Africa . I still have the mental and physical scars of that trip - especially the one dissecting my right butt cheek. During this doomed trip, I had thought that Johannesburg was probably not the most ideal place to scramble for suitable accommodation at an estimated arrival time of midnight. At the Zimbabwe/South African border post at Beitbridge, I had arranged beds (note, plural) for myself and another minibus taxi journeyman, a Belgian man called Jan, at a Pretoria backpackers. This phone call was made after successfully dodging the swarms of aggressive peanut merchants loitering around the phone boxes. I noticed that my recently purchased South African phone card displayed the helpful advice of ‘Don’t Cut Your Lifeline’ complete with pictures of a public phone handset and a set of open bolt cutters. Since my lifeline was not yet broken, I received an assurance from the Backpackers that they would wait for us until we arrived. Once I had finished drinking a gut-rotting Coke out of an ingeniously marketed AfriCAN, it was time to brace myself for another supersonic test ride. However, after continuing his kamikaze mission for another few hours, the mini-bus driver probably had another mini-bus taxi car park that was more important than mine and had completely bypassed Pretoria and was on the way to Johannesburg . After informing the death wish pilot, he exited the freeway at the midway suburb of Centurion and we said our humble goodbyes at the nearby service station. This may have sounded uneventful, but I received an eerie feeling when I spotted the ‘Hijacking Hotspot’ advisory sign at the top of the exit ramp. In an unconvincingly reassuring voice, I said to Jan ‘It mustn’t be THAT bad – the Hijacking Hotspot sign hasn’t been hijacked yet!’ I only received a slight, uneasy smile from this corny joke – we were both tired from too many kilometres and hours on the road. We called a less suicidal taxi with some Rand shrapnel and managed to reach Pretoria without being hijacked, where we pleaded for the Backpackers to let us in at midnight. To our delight, a muddled voice answered on the intercom and a buzzer sounded to release the thick steel bar security gates. We were stuffed and there was only a queen bed available in the entire hostel. After 12 hours on the Victoria Falls train, four hours lounging on backpacks in a hot Bulawayo mini bus taxi car park, and 11 hours on the supersonic mini-bus, I did not give a rats. The queen bed was the most comfort I had encountered in days, and it didn’t matter who I shared it with. I was quite prepared to endure an unconscious man-hug from Jan at three o’clock in the morning if I had to, but I really needed to sleep. And so did Jan. After washing off the slimy African grime from the previous two days, we both crashed in an exhausted slump, grateful to still be alive. The minibus taxi rating on the Crazy Driver Index (out of 10) – 11. In conclusion, crazy drivers are one of the joys of travelling, and are part of the authentic travel experience. Just make sure your life insurance is up to date and of a considerable amount!
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Egypt Sports 
Aswan, Nile Valley, Egypt
Aswan, Egypt's sunniest southern city and ancient frontier town located about 81 miles south of Luxor, has a distinctively African atmosphere. Its ancient Egyptian name was Syene. Small enough to walk around and graced with the most beautiful setting on the Nile, the pace of life is slow and relaxing. Days can be spent strolling up and down the broad Corniche watching the sailboats etch the sky with their tall masts or sitting in floating restaurants listening to Nubian music and eating freshly caught fish. In Aswan the Nile is at its most beautiful, flowing through amber desert and granite rocks, round emerald islands covered in palm groves and tropical plants. Explore the souk, full of the scent and color of spices, perfumes, scarves and baskets. View the spectacular sunsets while having tea on the terrace of the Old Cataract Hotel (Named due to the location of the Nile's first cataract located here). Aswan has been a favorite winter resort since the beginning of the nineteenth century, and it's still a perfect place to get away from it all. Every night Nubian dancers and musicians perform in the Cultural Center, just off the Corniche. Folklore troupes recreate scenes from village life and perform the famous Nubian mock stick-fight dances.
Dancers at the Cultural Center Aswan is a strategic location which currently houses a garrison of the Egyptian army, but which has also seen ancient Egyptian garrisons, as well as that of General Kitchener, Turkish troops of the Ottoman empire and the Romans. The city proper lies on the east bank of the Nile. Relax here, visit a few mosques, but then prepare for an adventure. The bazaar runs along the Corniche, which continues past the Ferial Gardens and the Nubian Museum, and continues on to the Cemetery, with its forest of cupolas surmounted tombs from the Fatimid period. Just east of the cemetery in the famous area quarries is the gigantic Unfinished Obelisk . Just to the south of this, two Graeco-Roman sarcophagi and an unfinished colossus remain half buried in the sand. The most obvious is Elephantine Island , which is timeless with artifacts dating from pre-Dynastic times onward. It is the largest island in the area. Just beyond Elephantine is Kitchener's Island (Geziret el-Nabatat). It was named for the British general Haratio Kitchener (185--1916) and was sent to Egypt in 1883 to reorganize the Egyptian army, which he then led against the Sudanese Mahdi. But the island is known for its garden and the exotic plants the Kitchener planted there, and which continue to flourish today. On the opposite shore (west bank), the cliffs are surmounted by the tomb of a marabut, Qubbet el-Hawwa, who was a local saint. Below are tombs of the local (pharaonic) nobles and dignitaries. Upriver a bit is the tomb of Mohammed Shah Aga Khan who died in 1957. Known as the Tomb of the Aga Khan , it is beautiful in its simplicity. A road from there leads back to the Coptic Monastery of St Simeon , which was built in the sixth century in honor of Amba Hadra, a local saint. Just up river a bit, there is also the old Aswan dam, built by the British, which was enlarged, expanded, but unable to control the Nile for irrigation.
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Dhahab, Sinai Region, Egypt
GO THERE! so chill and gorgeous. you also have access to amazing outdoor activities like diving, snorkeling, hiking in canyons and up mt sinai and atv-ing! the people are very kind, and there is nothing like chillin in a beahcside restauraunt with some sheesha til the wee hours!
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Sharm el-Sheikh, Sinai Region, Egypt
Beautiful underwater world. Perfect weather in spring and autumn (about 30°degrees). Naama Bay is very touristic. For Shopping is Old Sharm quite less expensive. Always try to get a less price. You need to go to the Nationalpark Ras Mohamed and Nabq, make a Trip with Quads in the desert, go snorkeling on a boat and a lot more. Egyptian do not drink Alcohol. So drinks are expensive in compare with food or anything else. For going out I recommend "El Fanar", Pacha, Hard Rock and Alf Leila wa Leila.
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Sharm el-Sheikh, Sinai Region, Egypt
I went camping at Sharm-el-sheikh. That was in 1978. Never saw a resort, felt lucky when we found a bedouin run cafe that offered chilled drinks. It was pristine and primitive and extremely beautiful. Trip was run by the Nature Preservation Society of Israel and we spent each day hiking, climbing and snorkeling. One of the best adventures of my life.
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Sharm el-Sheikh, Sinai Region, Egypt
this place is absolutely goreous if you love white beaches an crystal clear waters it is for you!!!! scuba an snorkeling!!!! if you like to eat and party go to nama bay for an exsiting night life!!!! there the food and partys are awsome, places like little buda, hard rock cafe and paccas!!!!
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Food in Egypt 
Al Jizah, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
Gizah, or Giza or however you want to spell it is one of the oldest tourist destinations in the world. Home of the Great Pyramids of Giza. When I visited, I went in the late afternoon (mostly because we couldn't get directions...no one seemed to know where the pyramids were and how to get to them), but the setting sun was amazing against the pyramids. Taxis are overflowing as are souvenir shops. They're selling exactly what you're looking for. Don't believe me? Just ask them and they'll tell you the same thing.
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Alexandria, Mediterranean Coast, Egypt
Some people think Alex doesn't live up to its past. No more pharos, tomb of Alexander, or even the multi-cultured feel the place had up until the 1950s. But, there is enough of the old Alex for the place to be relaxing and charming (especially compared to Cairo). The corniche area from the Fort to the new library is lovely to walk down. The Cecil hotel in the main square still has colonial charm and there are some lovely restaurants and cafes in this area. The Roman catacombs are also worth a visit.
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Alexandria, Mediterranean Coast, Egypt
The Famous House Of The Writer K.Kavafis Surely Worths A Visit.
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Alexandria, Mediterranean Coast, Egypt
A visit to Alexandria is not complete without a visit to the Catacombs of Kom Ash-Shuqqafa. Open from 9am to 4pm cost is about 12 Egyptian Pound. Well worth it. Booking is not required but more information can be obtained on 484 5800. Cameras are not permitted and bags need to be left at the ticket counter while you descend into the unknown.
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Aswan, Nile Valley, Egypt
Activities, to go see the Aswan Dam that has created the largest man-made lake in the world. It is easy to get to by taxi.
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Egypt Government 
Al Uqsur, Nile Valley, Egypt
Life story of queen Hatshepsut is really interesting!! she was very strong woman and she wasn't really that kind of fair ideal person Queen "Hatshepsut" was the first one to send ships to the country's "Puntland" (Somalia now), so they are loaded and perfumes .. And "Hatshepsut" is the fifth kings of the eighteenth dynasty, which also belongs to the King "Tutankhamen." A daughter "Thutmose I," and wife "Thutmose II," has received the sentence with "Thutmose III," which was the son of one of her husband Gariaat, at the same time, her daughter's husband, and remained until her death in 1484 BC holding the reins of government, the ruling was over cogens her life, and deported "Thutmose III" from power, it was not described to him in the Governing Although she was a female had represented itself in the form of statues man has been flat without breasts, and has borrowed to live. Having died liberation "Thutmose III" from the trusteeship of heavy, and I like to retaliate against them Vatm construction of the temple, and the proportion of the same, and the name and crush most forms excavated and icons, and a place name and his titles in many quarters (please look the pictures i put inside) The design and implementation of building the temple Engineer "die" QC and one close to it. It belongs to a family of modest "Armant" but became the first president to acknowledge reception of the royal family, and the President receiving machine "Amon", and is in charge of all construction, so it made the greatest professional successes in the history of ancient Egypt.
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
--- Napoleon ---

Napoleon and Europe
The French, under Napoleon Bonaparte, came to Egypt in 1798. They had come ashore, confronted the army of the Mamluks in the battle of the Pyramids, and soundly defeated them. Napoleon sought the cooperation of the native Egyptian leaders.
He tried to convince them that he was a friend to the muslims and that he invaded Egypt to free the people from the oppression of the Mamluks, not to destroy Islam.
As well as creating governmental changes, Napoleon and the French founded the Institut Francais, a seat of learning to work for the advancement of science, economics, arts, literature, and other disciplines. French scientists and engineers also worked on improving roads, building factories, and constructing arsenals. Napoleon also introduced the Arabic printing press to Egypt.
The Ottoman government worked against Napoleon, and the British, under Lord Nelson, destroyed the French ships, cutting off the French in Egypt. Rebellion erupted, especially in Cairo, and was quickly put down. However, with Ottoman attacks and British help, the French were forced to leave Egypt and the Ottomans were in charge again.
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Cairo, Cairo & Surrounding Region, Egypt
--- The Egyptian Prince --- Ali Bey, was able to rise to his position of authority as Shayk Al Balad, or the governor of Cairo in 1763 because of the governing system imposed on Egypt by the conquering Ottomans. But he was forced to flee to Arabia.

Becoming the strongest of the Mameluke beys, Ali Bey won back his position of Shayk Al-Balad. When war broke out between Russia and Turkey, Ali Bey declared Egypt’s independence and proposed to fight on the Russian side and refused to pay any more money to the Ottomans. Next, he invaded Syria. But he was betrayed by his rival Ismail Bey and killed in 1773. Ismail returned Egypt to the Ottoman control, but it still remained in the hands of the Mamelukes.
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Egypt Economy 
Sharm el-Sheikh, Sinai Region, Egypt
You have to be vewry fit for the 2.5 hour uphill walk in sand to get to Mt sinai the the 500 odd steps up to 18 inches high! If you want to enjoy the experience when older or not fit hire a camel for about $25AUD then have a local pull you up the steps for a small sum. All this is done in the dark but the walk down is relaxed and in daylight. Many hundreds of people go daily so don't expect a romantic lone desert climb. Lots of food and drinks stops that help the local economy. A mush have is a hot chocolate at the top. yum and thaws your very frozen hands!!
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