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A large number of travelers choose to pay Fiji Islands a visit when traveling through Fiji. Fiji Islands has some great beaches, snorkeling, and sun tanning, and it's definitely worth stopping over a few days in Fiji Islands if you're traveling to Fiji. Popular attractions include the Natadola Beach and Otto and Fanny's. There's a lot more to check out in Fiji Islands, so take some time to explore this Fiji Islands travel guide to find out more about this place.
Questions answered about visiting Fiji Islands
Mandi
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Any recomendations on Fiji? I'm working on planning my trip to Fiji. Going to be there for 1-2 weeks. Want to do some diving. Any diving/sightseeing/accomation (not super high end) tips?
Billie
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Hey! I've a question about traveling to fiji. I wanted to go next February for doing my divemaster over there. But I heard at this time it's really rainy. Should I wait until april or is it not that bad?
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Travel Tips from people who've been to Fiji Islands
Tonight, I wanted to see The Magic of the South Seas, a show which takes place twice weekly at the Sheraton Fiji. It is hosted by a local witchdoctor by the name of Tupa'I Bruno, and as the in-flight magazine on the plane had given over nearly five pages to the show I thought it must be worth seeing. The Sheraton resort is bloody huge, as you would expect from an international chain like themselves, and just a tad on the lavish side. I was treated like a visiting dignitary by the staff from the moment I got out of the taxi, which had entered the resort across a bridge which I took to indicate that the resort was on its own island. As it was a while before the show started, I decided to have dinner in the Foyer restaurant, if for no other reason than that I would be able to tell people I had dined at the Sheraton. There were a lot of designer shops dotted around the lobby of the hotel, selling the most expensive jewellery and watches you can imagine. Out of interest, I enquired as to how much the rooms were. The receptionist handed me the current price list, looking me carefully up and down and mentioning that they could probably do something to cut the prices down if I was on a budget. I didn't quite know how to take this. The least expensive rooms in the place started at F$495 a night - about £180, and went up to more lavish rooms at a mere £400 a night. I told them I would have to think it over, and went outside to laugh loudly into the night. The show started at 8.00PM in the Sheraton Pavilion, a huge circus tent that had been erected behind the hotel. Tupa'I Bruno apparently used to work in the circus before going on to spend many years manufacturing tents for travelling shows. He has, in recent years, become an official Witchdoctor in Samoa and travelled the Polynesian Triangle performing his unique blend of magic and dance. On his travels, he has even been thrown out of countries for practising "The Black Arts", and for the time being it seems he has got fed up travelling and taken root at the Sheraton Fiji Resort. Like all showmen, I don't think it'll be too long before he moves on elsewhere. Bruno is a funny little man, totally different on stage from what you might expect of a witchdoctor and world class magician. From the fliers and other advertising material, I had been rather under the impression that he was a big menacing character with fire coming out of his nose and a bone through his neck. The photos show him standing over the charred remains of human bodies, waving magic wands around in the air and dancing about in the middle of burning buildings - more or less what you would expect from a witchdoctor, in fact! In reality, however, Bruno is difficult to describe. He is a small, chunky man with a bald head and squinty little eyes. Actually, he's quite easy to describe, isn't he? Bruno rushes around the stage in more the manner of a clown or a dandy than a serious entertainer, making camp Carry On Matron style oooh sounds at everything - whether its a female dancer appearing on stage with a grass skirt hanging suggestively from her waist, or a member of the audience being cut in half with a chainsaw. Perhaps this is his circus background showing through. Only about 50% of the show was actually what I would term magic. There was plenty of juggling and fire-walking, and the rest of the show was really more about beautiful Polynesian dancing girls with very little on and tattooed men performing tribal dancing displays. He also had a sixteen year old girl called Princess Zula as part of the act, supposedly from the entirely fictitious island of Bula-Bula - "Hello Hello" in Fijian. She climbed to the top of a high rope and performed incredible acrobatics on tight-ropes and high gantries as the audience covered their eyes and hoped she didn't fall to her death. It was every bit as entertaining as any other circus act and there's no denying Princess Zula probably has a future in the business, but it really wasn't magic - and what magic we did get was pretty second rate. There were no big illusions as such, just a lot of Bruno inviting people from the audience to pick cards or have knives thrown at them. A couple of the Hawaiian Hula-girls got levitated or cut in half in novel ways, but Bruno was largely let down by his equipment and the audience was badly positioned so that we kept catching glimpses of how the tricks were being done as he darted around the back. It's a shame. The show has a lot of potential, but I have to say I spent most of my time watching a half hearted attempt at an obvious trick and wondering when the girls in the grass skirts were coming back on! The taxi driver spent most of the journey back to the Naviti trying to persuade me to pay him to take me to a local nightclub where presumably he was getting a commission. He attempted to sell me on the idea with the promise "Fiji girls, they like western men. You'll have a very happy night, I promise."

You can read my full travel journals at www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer and www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer2
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At 30,000 feet, the stewardess on flight FJ910 to Fiji asked me if I would like the chicken or the lamb. I have absolutely no idea why she asked me this, because what I got on my tray didn't even begin to come close to either of them. I read once that McDonalds were being considered to take over the in-flight catering on British Airways flights, but I gather that nothing came of it.It's a shame, really - I quite like the idea of being asked by a stewardess with a little red and yellow hat if I would like the Big Mac in a red wine sauce or the Chicken McNuggets Parmesan. At least you wouldn't have to concern yourself too much with whether to eat in or take away. The flight from Australia to Fiji only takes about three hours, which is a lot less than I had been expecting - it almost seemed as though we were returning to the ground before even reaching cruising altitude, but perhaps that's because I've got used to some seriously long haul flights over the last three months and anything less than twelve hours seems like heaven. After showing a ridiculously unfunny film starring Leslie Nielson, a man who these days seems to get every comedy part going, we were forced to watch a short information film on the Fiji Islands. I say "forced", although I do admit that no actual guns were used or anything - it's just that, having been given headsets so that we could choose whether to listen to the film or not, we were given no option for turning off the soundtrack to the Fiji information film. Some of the passengers had clearly had long days and were not at all happy to be woken up mid-flight, and the old lady in the seat next to me was so startled that she stuck me with a pointy elbow as she twisted around in her seat. I learnt, courtesy of the information film, that Fiji has come a long way since the days when being invited over for lunch suggested you could expect to be eaten somewhere between the fish course and desert. This is always nice to know when arriving in a new country, although I think most of us had already taken it for granted before booking that we're no longer living in the days of cannibals and head-hunters. Unsurprisingly, Fiji doesn't much like being known around the world as The Cannibal Islands, although they clearly still find the time to remind everybody on the way in just in case any of us step out of line. I would like to say that Fiji has made a lot of effort to bring themselves into the modern world and put their past behind them, but the problem is that they seem to have stopped the modernisation process somewhere in the seventies. I remember thinking that if the haircuts on the people in the information film were anything to go by, everybody in Fiji must look like a member of the Jackson Five. This was seriously funny stuff - every man, woman and child in the film was proudly sporting a microphone haircut of the first order. I assumed, at least until leaving the plane on the Fijian Island of Viti Levu, that this information film had been made some time ago and they'd been showing it ever since - but No! Upon disembarking, I was met with the sight of a lounge full of seventies throwbacks. The land that time forgot. I wanted to go up to the nearest guy and ask if he knew Huggy Bear.You can read my full travel journals at www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer and www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer2
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It hadn't really occurred to me that it might be raining, but it was chucking it down. Fiji is slap in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, about as close to the equator as you can get without having to jump up and down going "Ow" on the hot ground all day - I had pretty much imagined I'd be walking around in a loin cloth for the next few days, but it looks as though it might actually be quite pleasant. I was met from the plane by a woman who stood out from the crowd straight away in that she was the only one without a seventies hairstyle, so I assumed her to be either the rep from my holiday company or a local who was trying to be dangerously unhip. She directed me to the small office of a company called Rosie Tours, where I sat in front of a small desk waiting for the bus that was to take me to my hotel and being chatted to with massive amounts of enthusiasm by somebody else with a microphone for a head. The bus, when it arrived, was empty - I had assumed it to be taking so long because they had to pick lots of other people up from somewhere on the way, but it turns out that everybody here is simply on "Island time". In other words, they'll get around to it when they feel like it. My sort of people. I fought the urge to swing myself into the vehicle through the window seventies style, and propped my tired eyes open for the duration of the journey so that I could take in what this island paradise had to offer. I know I've only just arrived, but so far I'm pretty impressed. Not only has Fiji not been motivated by the perceived need to cut down all the trees and build office blocks everywhere, but apart from the main city of Suva, 95% of the 333 islands that make up the Fiji chain are still covered in rainforest. We seemed to drive through endless countryside on the way to the resort, and the sun was setting as we drove. I've never seen anything so beautiful in my life - as the sun dropped out of sight, there was this sort of ethereal glow across the treetops. Fiji is claiming that it will be the first place in the world to witness the dawn of the next millennium, although to be honest introducing daylight savings time to the islands may have allowed them to cheat a little on this, and I can't really imagine at this moment anywhere I'd rather be on the 31st December this year. My hotel, The Naviti Beach Resort, is nestled in its own grounds one and a half hours away from the airport. It seems to be quite a relaxing place with palm trees growing everywhere and acres of gardens, beaches and forest land all to itself. There are two restaurants, and nightly entertainment such as fire-walking in the open sided Bar/Lounge. On arrival I was given a shell necklace to wear for the duration of my visit, and everybody here seems to be doing the same. Something tells me that this is going to be a very laid back week.

You can read my full travel journals at www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer and www.offexploring.com/globalwanderer2
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Recent Updates for Fiji Islands
Ben G. wrote a tip on Fiji Islands
2 years ago
About Fiji.. not the most obvious destination to travel to from South Africa... but.. (More)
Danie B. wrote a tip on Fiji Islands
2 years ago
try and learn the language and hang out with local people so you can learn about.. (More)
Michael H. answered Mandi G.'s question:
3 years ago
Any recomendations on Fiji? I'm working on planning my trip to Fiji. Going to be.. (More)
Nathan P. wrote a tip on Fiji Islands
3 years ago
You have to Island hop, there are so many wonderful islands and locations to take.. (More)
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