ADD TO LIST
Founded in 1905 by the French as an outpost, Pakse (Pakse) is the largest city within the Champasak province.  It is located south of Laos at the confluence of the Mekong and the Se Don River near the Thailand border.  Pakse is a gateway to the Bolaven Plateau.
Travel Tips from people who've been to Pakxe

If you don't like rain, mud, or walking much, I suggest not to go to Pakse during rainy season (June-August).  However, if you can stand all that, you might appreciate the jungles and waterfalls in southern Laos near Champasak and Pakse.  I found it more beautiful walking around in the rain.  Everything was green and the mud was...mud.  It made it more fun.  Everything gets wet and dirty and you might slip a little here and there.  In my opinion rainy season is the best season.  Just bring some extra clothes for changing.  If you are scared of getting a cold, just wear a pancho and some rain boots and you'll be fine.

Good tip?
(+1)
The red clay is pretty when its wet...
After a visa-crunch and 14 hour overnight bus ride through southern Laos, and a busdriver who blared Lao pop karaoke tapes at top volume, Pakse was a welcome site. Extensive Laotian travel is exhaustive, mentally and physically. You feel bones rattling in your body you didn't know you had, you wonder if chinese-water-torture could be much worse than this. You fantasize about pillows and ice cubes.

Dawn had just broken, and everything was dewy. The early morning air was cool and refreshing, the first specs of sunlight bouning off the red-tiled roofs of Pakse. Thomas & I had an early-morning, getting-off-that-stupid-bus beer with a Canadian artist. There are a handful of internet cafes and backpacker-friendly eateries, even some good Indian cuisine. The locals are shy but friendly, and life is noticeably slower than in Northern Laos. You can feel the kinks in your neck start to unwind a little bit as you sit by the side of the road, watching the schoolkids ambling by, smiling shyly at you. After a nap in grungy-hotel-from-Lonely-Planet, we were off again for the 4,000 Islands

Coming back through Pakse afterwards was a much... grittier... experience. Stef (enroute at the time) got an email from me warning "Welcome to the sand storm known as Pakse". The lovely red clay roads, when not sufficiently watered down, swell up. Operation "get out of pakse" was in full force, my resolve was unstoppable. "Cambodia, here i come" I muttered into the crook of my arm as I staggered through the red swirls, trying to cover my eyes. The Lao Aviation office was naturally on the other side of town. The town seemed to freeze in the dust, I thought of Pompeii. Although i could have just as easily shown up at the airport & been fine, as it turned out. The Pakse airport is a one-gate, one-desk, one-ticket-taker kind of deal. all 4 people working at the airport knew of my plans by the time I left. A french guy & I had a good chuckle at how we were the only two passengers for the day. I highly recommend Lao aviation from Pakse to Siem Reap - a full lunch was served on a 40 minute flight, plenty of comfortable room for a little plane, and sweet attendants.

... written in 2005 when I visited (check out my travelogue & photos).
Good tip?
(0)
 Retire et change de l argent avant de partir au sud. un restaurant indien pret du French bridge est excellent. Sedone river guest house est une bonne addresse pas cher. Restaurant le panorama est sublime.
Good tip?
(0)
Recent Updates for Pakxe
Simon-Pierre A. wrote a tip on Pakxe
4 years ago
Retire et change de l argent avant de partir au sud. un restaurant indien pret du.. (More)
Gecko G. updated the guide: Pakxe
4 years ago
Eszter C. has added a photo for Pakxe
5 years ago
Eszter C. has added a photo for Pakxe
5 years ago
Ask a travel question about Pakxe