Peru What to Expect

Dangers & Annoyances in Peru 

There are many dangers and annoyances in Peru, so travelers in Peru must maintain a sharp awareness of their surroundings and exercise a good deal of caution.


Thievery

Unfortunately, thievery such as pick-pocketing and snatch theft is rampant in Peru. Thieves often work in pairs or larger groups, and work variations of a basic theme: a person approaches you and draws your attention away from your backpack, pockets or other valuable items giving their partner(s) the opportunity to rob you without being noticed. Also, some thieves use razor blades to cut open backpacks in search of valuables, and are skilled enough to do it and go unnoticed even when travelers are wearing the backpacks. Thieves usually operate in crowded areas where travelers are most likely to be distracted and less likely to notice someone fiddling with their stuff such as a bus station, popular city square or market place.

There are several things that travelers can do to avoid getting robbed while in Peru. First, it is important to remain alert and well-aware of your surroundings. Thieves generally go after easy targets: travelers that are tired or bewildered. It is also very helpful to travel with a buddy when going to market places or other crowded places so that you can keep an eye on one another.  Make it even more difficult for thieves to snatch things from you or do things behind your back by keeping your valuables close to your body and in front of you.  Wear your backpack on your chest and your camera strap under your sweater. Finally, it is much more difficult for thieves to rob you in stealth when you are moving, so staying in motion offers another degree of protection.


Getting drugged and subsequently robbed

While this is rare, from time to time you hear of travelers going out to a local nightclub, meeting a group of girls and inviting them back to their rooms, getting knocked out by drugs slipped in their drinks, and getting robbed of everything except the clothes they are wearing. Travelers are advised to be very careful about the circumstances in which they consume alcohol, and who they invite into their space.


Plain-clothed “policemen”

Travelers may encounter a plain-clothed Peruvian claiming to be a policeman. While most such individuals are real policemen, some have turned out to be thieves using this ruse to catch travelers off guard and steal from them. When encountering a Peruvian claiming to be a plain-clothed policemen, do not give him any valuable papers, and insist on going straight to the local police station by foot.


Armed Robbery & Roadside Hold-Ups

While this happens a lot less that pick-pocketing and snatch theft in Peru, it is still a problem, especially in the more rural areas of the country. Traveling in groups offers no protection whatsoever, and even transport busses get held up. Armed robbery is much more likely to happen at night than during the day, so it is recommended that travelers stick to day busses when getting around, especially in rural areas.


Express Kidnapping

This is a form of armed robbery where the robbers take you with them to visit one ATM machine after another until they have maxed-out your daily withdrawal limit. This occurs very infrequently in Peru, and while the robbers may be rough with their victims, express kidnapping usually happens without incident if the victim does not offer any resistance.

Guerrillas, Bandits & Drug Trafficking

Certain areas should really be avoided due to guerrilla or bandit activity. This includes the Rio Huallaga valley areas where most Peru’s illegal drugs are grown, and certain stretches of the northern Loreto border with Columbia.


Getting ripped off

While the majority of businesses in Peru are above board in their dealings with travelers, some tour agencies and operators try to rip off travelers. A common way travelers get ripped off is by handing over money without receiving a receipt. Receipts are you’re only credible proof of transaction in Peru, and without it, tour agencies may ask you to pay a second time or walk away with your money. As such, it is imperative that travelers never hand over money without a receipt and always keep their receipts before and during their tour.

When you are interested in a tour departing from another town or region of Peru than in the town you may be in, agencies often claim that the tour gets booked up easily and that you should book in advance with them to secure you a spot. Sometimes this is true, other times the agency is simply trying to make a commission. The trouble for travelers is that, booking in advance from another town or city is usually more expensive than booking when you get there. The best way to be sure that the agency’s claim has any merit is to talk to other travelers having just arrived from the area you plan on going to. Hopefully they will have a pretty good idea of how booked up the tours are.


Road Accidents

Travelers should also be aware of the dangers associated with Peru’s poor road conditions and traffic safety record (see “By Road” in the “Transportation – Getting Around” section). It is highly recommended that travelers ride on reputable bus lines with good a good safety record.

Last edited Oct 11, 07 2:24 PM. Contributors:
Machupicchu, Cusco Region, Peru
If you take the train in, stay in the town of Aguas Calientes the night before you plan to go to Machu Picchu. By staying in the town, you can get to the entrance first and snap some photos of the site without other tourists in your photos!
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(+6)
Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Machu Picchu for less than $80 dollars.
Going to South America? Or travelling Peru? No trip is complete without a visit to the lost city of the Inca's, Machu Picchu. But what if you're backpacking and trying to live on less than a minimum a day? The train from Cusco to Machu Picchu can cost up to $130 for a return (which is a big chunk out of your budget) and that doesn't even include things like accommodation, food or other transport. But as always, there's a way around (literally this time). I have to admit, it takes a bit longer but that doesn't mean a day wasted. It takes you over mountain roads and through lush green valleys, you'll pass scenic villages and sandy lost towns, you'll encounter some landslides and very steep cliffs. Even that would be worth the trip.

First, take an (early) bus to Ollantaytambo, 1.5 hours. Here you'll find the best remaining example of the planning of an Inca town. A little walk outside the town will bring you to ruins, a nice first stop. From the main square you'll need to catch the (big red) bus to Santa Maria. This ride takes about 3,5 hours and brings you up to about 4000 meters and then back down into the heat. During rain season (oct-apr) there are many landslides on the road. It's safe to drive there, though it might take a little longer because the men on the bus need to jump off to take away the rocks. In Santa Maria you haggle over a taxi that takes you through Santa Teresa, all the way up to the Hydroelectrica. This shouldn't cost more than 3-5 dollar. The road follows the river and goes along some really steep cliffs, don't sit at the window if you suffer from vertigo. You'll be dropped off at the Hydroelectrica, which is, apart from being a hydroelectrica, the train station at the end of the train track. The part from Aguas Calientes to Hydroelectrica wasn't in use for a couple of years but is used again. Here you can choose whether you want to take the train or walk along the train tracks. If you decide to walk, be careful and listen if you can hear the train coming. You'll hear it from quite a distance though. Don't forget to bring a flashlight since you'll have to go through a tunnel. It will take about 4 hours to walk, the train will get you there in about 30 minutes and costs $8. Either way, you'll end up in Aguas Calientes where you spend the night. It's best to buy your entrance ticket that day in Aguas Calientes to skip the queue at Machu Picchu ($20/$40 student/adult). There's two ways of getting to the archaeological site, by bus or by foot. The walk is quite tough, all uphill for about an hour. I would say, save your energy and take the bus so you can climb Huayna Picchu, the mountain towering over the lost city. The bus costs $7 and takes 40 minutes.
Then, enjoy!
For the way back, you can take exactly the same way. Unfortunately the train to Hydroelectrica only leaves at 7.00 and 12.00 am. This would mean a short visit to Machu Picchu if you want to climb the mountain as well. Though the site opens at 6.00 am so you should be able to catch the 12.00 am train (allow 2 hours for the mountain). Otherwise you can stay an extra day or take the train directly to Cusco or Ollantaytambo. If you're in the train to the Hydroelectrica, try to find some tour guides that go back to Cusco. They'll take you for about $15.
Adding up all the costs will leave you spending:
1. Cusco - Ollantaytambo: $4
2. Ollantaytambo - Santa Maria: $5
3. Santa Maria - Hydroelectrica: $4
4. Train to Aguas Calientes (x2): $16
5. Hydroelectrica - Cusco : $15
6. Bus to Machu Picchu : $14
7. Accommodation: $6
8. Food: $15
Total: $79
You can skip numbers 4 and 6, saving you another 30 dollars.

Welcome to Machu Picchu poor backpackers!
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Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Try to get an accommodation in San Blas. For headaches, try Mate de Coca, helps a lot!
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Puerto Maldonado, Amazon Basin, Peru
Avoid the hideous shopping centre! If you're just stopping over on your way further south or before heading accross to the national parks, you would do better to stay in Puerto Varas.
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Machupicchu, Cusco Region, Peru
Without climbing onto Wayna Picchu... it is not the same! It’s the big mountain behind the Machu Picchu complex that gives the character to the whole archaeological site. Although the access is a little bit difficult, the view that you have from the top of the mountain is incredible and it’s worth the effort to climb it. It is a place that you won’t want to miss and will make an unforgettable memory of the citadel for you. After entering the Machu Pichu Citadel you will have to climb for a very narrow and steep path, it will take you 60 minutes to 1 ½ hour to complete it and you will arrive to a place where you will see and amazing landscape of Machu Picchu. You have to enter the Wayna Picchu before 2 pm, and leave it before 4 pm.
Only 300 people per day are allowed to climb on it. So if for example at 10 am 300 people went trough they close the entry!
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Traveling with Children in Peru 
Traveling with children in Peru is quite feasible. Children are allowed virtually everywhere as long as they are accompanied by an adult.  Parents can maintain the safety of their children while traveling if they exercise right amount of caution and common sense. This includes being well aware of the dangers of Peru (see “dangers and annoyances” and “health and safety” of the “Once you are there” section), and being especially diligent in monitoring your children’s condition and situation. Parents are advised to be extra careful in monitoring their children’s health for signs of altitude sickness, dehydration or sunburn, as children can be unaware that they are experiencing these conditions.
 
In terms of logistics, traveling around with children can be difficult due to some long periods in transit, sometimes exceeding 12 hours. Using planes as a primary means of getting from one area to another alleviates this problem. For children under the age of 18, documents proving relationship to the parent(s) is required, as customs officials and police are on the lookout for possible kidnappings. Written consent from the other parent may also be required. If the other parent is deceased, a copy of the death certificate can be helpful. Prices can often be cheaper for children in Peru. Small children that must be carried generally ride free, except in planes where the fare is usually 10% of that of the adult accompanying the child.
Last edited Oct 11, 07 12:37 PM. Contributors:
Amazon Basin, Peru
I did a trip up the amazon river right from the start in Peru when it still is river Urubamba. Tip: Don't book a guide, you don't need them. Bring your hammock for sleeping on the boats and the strongest insect repellent, maybe even a moskito net. Bring time... some days you are waiting for the next boat on the river bank but its not coming, and sometimes they tell you the boat is leaving but it leaves the next day... Bring enough cash - there are no ATM in the amazon. If you want you can bring little gifts for the village kids...
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Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Don't just stay in this town for a night before or after your trip to Machu Picchu. Stick around town for a week and get to know the place. The children who sell finger puppets and other junk on the streets are incredibly funny and I've actually remained in contact through email with many of the town's youth. The bars show movies during the day, often ones that just came out in the theaters in the US. The town is really pleasant and worth far more attention than it gets from many tourists.
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Amazon Basin, Peru
When I was traveling the Amazon river on different boats one thing was remarkable to me - that there were no trash bins on the boats and everybody was throwing their garbage into the river!!! But as everywhere this is a very sensible ecosystem... I just had watched the rare pink river dolphins minutes ago... So I started to make a difference, even when it was small. I opened up my own trash bag and then when I saw kids throwing their garbage out I told them that it is not right. I even gave them some bananas... Guess what happened after a while?! All these children always brought all their garbage to me in my bag :) that made me happy because they didn't know better - nobody had ever showed them how to deal with garbage or explained them why it is not good to throw it out. But I told them about all these wonderful animals I extra came for who live in their river. So even if only one kid learn something it helped - but I wish more and more will follow before it is too late.
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Peru Health 
Peru’s geography and climate present a number of health and safety hazards that all travelers should be well aware of. While they may seem overwhelming at first, familiarization with these hazards, basic precautions and the proper handling of problems that do occur greatly mitigate the health risks of traveling in Peru.

Medical Resources
Medical care is generally good in Lima, adequate in other major cities, and poor in all other areas of the country. This makes things even more precarious for travelers in rural areas requiring proper medical attention due to illness or injury.

Contaminated food and water
Peru’s running water is not potable for tourists. Drinking the water will result in gastro-intestinal sickness that can last up to several weeks, with vomiting and diarrhea, which in turn can lead to severe dehydration. This condition is commonly referred to as “tourista” in most South American countries. Dysentery and Giardiasis are also transmitted by contaminated water in Peru, and intestinal worms can be transmitted through improperly cooked meat and vegetables.
 
It is critical that travelers do not drink any form of running water unless it has been treated with water purification tablets. Boiling the water for 5-8 minutes is another option, but not at higher altitudes where water boils at lower temperatures that certain microorganisms can survive in. bottled water (aqua con gas & aqua sin gas) is available almost everywhere in Peru—do not buy bottles that have a broken seal as they may have been contaminated. Raw fruits and vegetables that have already been cut up and washed, may also result in gastro-intestinal sickness if contaminated water has been used.

Altitude Sickness
This is a potential life-threatening condition that can affect individuals traveling up into the Andean highlands. Be sure to acclimatize gradually to higher elevations and take any symptom of altitude sickness that does occur very seriously.

Sunburn
Located just south of the equator, Peru’s sunrays are deceptively strong, especially in the highlands, where a thinner atmosphere allows more of the sun’s rays to get though. It is recommended that travelers use sunblock with an SPF of at least 30. Learn more…

Hyperthermia (Heat Stroke)

Hot climates place a great deal of stress on the body, forcing it to work hard at dissipating its internal heat. Overworking the body this way will result in heat exhaustion and dehydration. If the body is unable to keep itself cool, it’s temperature will begin to rise to dangerous levels. This condition is called a heat stroke and it is life-threatening. To avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke, allow yourself 1-2 days to acclimatize to the heat, avoid or limit strenuous physical exertion, drink lots of fluids, and take frequent breaks during the day to cool down.

Hypothermia
It can get extremely cold at night high up in the Andes, so it is important to dress warmly and use a proper sleeping bag when camping in the mountains. Learn more…

Infectious diseases
Peru is host to several infectious diseases, most of which can be avoided though immunization (see
“Vaccines” in the “Before You Go” section) including:
  • Hepatitis A
  • Cholera
  • Typhoid fever
  • Yellow fever
  • Influenza
  • Smallpox
  • Tetanus
  • Diphtheria
  • Poliomyelitis
Infectious diseases that cannot be avoided through prior immunization, include:
  • Rabies – Immunization is administered immediately after a bite by an animal that could be infected with rabies.
  • Malaria – Travelers entering malaria zones should use insect repellent and take anti-malaria medication.
  • Dengue Fever – Travelers entering dengue fever zones should use insect repellent.
  • Chagas disease – This disease is transmitted by the “kissing bug” that can live in poorly kept houses, usually in cracks in the wall or a thatched roof. The disease can only be treated in the early stage, but with medication bringing important side effects. The best thing to do is always sleep under a mosquito net that wraps tightly under the mattress, as these bugs can also climb up from the floor. Spraying the feet and sides of the bed with insect repellent is also a good idea.
  • HIV & AIDS – It is estimated that between 0.2% to 0.5% of the Peruvian population suffers from AIDS or HIV. While this is by no means an elevated number, travelers are nevertheless urged to exercise caution and engage in safe protected sex.
Parasites, Animal Stings and Bites
In the Amazon basin, several species of flies, mites and ticks either lay eggs in peoples’ skin or bore their way in causing a great deal of discomfort. Some, such as the larvae of bottle flies can actually be felt as they hatch under the skin and burrow deeper. Copious amounts of insect repellant are recommended, as well as wearing long sleeve shirts, pants and a good pair of boots when trekking in the Jungle. To remove ticks, use tweezers and be sure to grab them by the head. Pinching the body can squirt the tick’s innards through its head and into your skin, which can cause the byte to become infected. It is also important that the head be removed as well.
 
Several forms of parasitic worms having an incredibly complex lifecycle involving both snail and human hosts cause a disease called Schistosomiasis. At one stage, the organism remains suspended in water, waiting to attach itself to a human host and bore its way into the skin and into the blood network. Once inside the human body they grow into worms of about 1 centimeter in length. Male and females couple to produce hundred of eggs a day, which escape the body through feces or urine. These worms typically live for 4-5 years, but can live up to 20 years in extreme cases. Avoiding swimming in contaminated areas is highly recommended.  Schistosomiasis can be treated with a single dose of Praziquantel.
 
There is also the Candiru fish that swims up the urethra and lodges itself in the urinary track causing a great deal of pain. The fish can only be removed surgically. Do not urinate while swimming in the Amazon and it is probably safer to wear a Speedo-style bathing suit.
 
Peru is host to a wide variety of snakes, most of which are venomous. This is one more reason to wear good hiking boots when trekking in the jungle. Jellyfish live in the pacific coastal shores of Peru. Jellyfish can deliver an astoundingly painful sting. Vinegar will help neutralize the painful sting. Finally, bites from rabid dogs, monkeys or other animals will transmit rabies into your system. If this happens you will need to be inoculated immediately.
 
Bedbugs can also be a problem in Peru. They live in dirty mattresses and beddings and come out at night to feed on individuals in their sleep, leaving several bite marks formed in even rows on the body. Small blood spots on the mattress or beddings are a good sign that bedbugs are present, so do not sleep in a bed whose mattress or beddings show such signs.
Infections All bites, stings, cuts and scratches must be thoroughly disinfected. If not properly sanitized, they can quickly develop into dangerous infections. Fungal infections can also be contracted, usually on the scalp, in the groin area, or between the toes. Ringworm is a form of fungal infection affecting various areas of the body. The best way to prevent fungal infections from taking root is to stay as dry as possible and not walk around barefoot. Be sure to dry thoroughly after bathing or showering, and ware loose-fitting clothes that that breathe well. To treat fungal infections, travelers must eradicate the fungus from their apparel as well as their bodies. This means washing clothes, towels and bed sheets in hot water as well as regularly disinfecting and treating the infected skin with anti-fungal creams or powders such as Tinactin.
Last edited Oct 11, 07 2:28 PM. Contributors:
Machupicchu, Cusco Region, Peru
you can use and abuse of "Mate de Coca " it's a tea made with coca leaves ( IT'S NOT A DRUG !!!! ) and it will effectively help you against the SOROCHE (Mountain illness) or you can also do like "the locals" chewing coca leaves ....but you have to like really "saur" tastes :) 
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Callao, Lima & Surrounding Region, Peru
Visit Callao early morn and leave early afternoon. Bring a long jacket, beware of pick pockets. Visit La Punta Beach and Get in and Get out by taxi. Visit Real San Felipe, an old fortress. 
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Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Stay calm the first day, let your body get used to the altitude (specially if you live in a place close to the sea level), if you are really prone to feel sick try to get an oxygen tank. If you are doing some hiking and feeling a bit dizzy, you will likely find some muña in the wilderness (ask a guide or a local for it) rub it with your hands and take a big whiff and it shall easy the sickness.
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Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Coca tea! Takes away that altitude sickness
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Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
The altitude sickness doesn't hit you at first but you feel it once you're there for at least two or three days. Bring meds to help. Chewing coca leaves helps if you're into the local flavor. Taking a bus there instead of flying will probably help you ease into it too. 
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Women Travelers in Peru 
Machismo behavior is still alive and well in Peru, where men often whistle or hiss at single women to get their attention, flirt openly and offer compliments on their attractiveness. And given that foreign women traveling in Peru are often perceived as being more sexually liberated (and therefore easier to seduce) than Peruvian women, women travelers can receive a lot of unwanted attention from Peruvian men. Traveling with other women does little to dissuade this behavior, but traveling with a male companion will greatly reduce the advances of the local men. In either case, the best way of dealing with the unwanted whistles, compliments and flirtatious remarks is to completely ignore them.
 
On certain occasions, women travelers have been raped while traveling in Peru. While Peru is not especially dangerous for women, women travelers are nonetheless advised to avoid dimly lit streets at night, and travel only in regulated taxis (rather than private taxis). Women are also advised not to travel alone in remote areas.
 
This being said, Peru remains an overall safe and pleasant place to visit for women, with countless numbers of women travelers having passed through the country without incident. Also, a lot of Peruvian men can be very friendly, and women travelers need not abstain from simple friendly interaction when it is offered.
Last edited Oct 11, 07 12:38 PM. Contributors:
Gay/Lesbian Travelers in Peru 

The attitudes of most Peruvians towards gays, lesbians, and transgendered people can be very macho, with the prevalent notion that men are supposed to play a dominant role towards women. As such, any form of effeminate behavior from a man, regardless of his sexual orientation, can be met with laughter and ridicule. Public displays of affection between gays or lesbians are often received with scorn, ridicule and on occasion, hostility. Homosexuality in legal in Peru, so gay and lesbian travelers need not worry about legal implications.

Last edited Oct 11, 07 12:39 PM. Contributors:
Machupicchu, Cusco Region, Peru
If you take the train in, stay in the town of Aguas Calientes the night before you plan to go to Machu Picchu. By staying in the town, you can get to the entrance first and snap some photos of the site without other tourists in your photos!
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(+6)
Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Machu Picchu for less than $80 dollars.
Going to South America? Or travelling Peru? No trip is complete without a visit to the lost city of the Inca's, Machu Picchu. But what if you're backpacking and trying to live on less than a minimum a day? The train from Cusco to Machu Picchu can cost up to $130 for a return (which is a big chunk out of your budget) and that doesn't even include things like accommodation, food or other transport. But as always, there's a way around (literally this time). I have to admit, it takes a bit longer but that doesn't mean a day wasted. It takes you over mountain roads and through lush green valleys, you'll pass scenic villages and sandy lost towns, you'll encounter some landslides and very steep cliffs. Even that would be worth the trip.

First, take an (early) bus to Ollantaytambo, 1.5 hours. Here you'll find the best remaining example of the planning of an Inca town. A little walk outside the town will bring you to ruins, a nice first stop. From the main square you'll need to catch the (big red) bus to Santa Maria. This ride takes about 3,5 hours and brings you up to about 4000 meters and then back down into the heat. During rain season (oct-apr) there are many landslides on the road. It's safe to drive there, though it might take a little longer because the men on the bus need to jump off to take away the rocks. In Santa Maria you haggle over a taxi that takes you through Santa Teresa, all the way up to the Hydroelectrica. This shouldn't cost more than 3-5 dollar. The road follows the river and goes along some really steep cliffs, don't sit at the window if you suffer from vertigo. You'll be dropped off at the Hydroelectrica, which is, apart from being a hydroelectrica, the train station at the end of the train track. The part from Aguas Calientes to Hydroelectrica wasn't in use for a couple of years but is used again. Here you can choose whether you want to take the train or walk along the train tracks. If you decide to walk, be careful and listen if you can hear the train coming. You'll hear it from quite a distance though. Don't forget to bring a flashlight since you'll have to go through a tunnel. It will take about 4 hours to walk, the train will get you there in about 30 minutes and costs $8. Either way, you'll end up in Aguas Calientes where you spend the night. It's best to buy your entrance ticket that day in Aguas Calientes to skip the queue at Machu Picchu ($20/$40 student/adult). There's two ways of getting to the archaeological site, by bus or by foot. The walk is quite tough, all uphill for about an hour. I would say, save your energy and take the bus so you can climb Huayna Picchu, the mountain towering over the lost city. The bus costs $7 and takes 40 minutes.
Then, enjoy!
For the way back, you can take exactly the same way. Unfortunately the train to Hydroelectrica only leaves at 7.00 and 12.00 am. This would mean a short visit to Machu Picchu if you want to climb the mountain as well. Though the site opens at 6.00 am so you should be able to catch the 12.00 am train (allow 2 hours for the mountain). Otherwise you can stay an extra day or take the train directly to Cusco or Ollantaytambo. If you're in the train to the Hydroelectrica, try to find some tour guides that go back to Cusco. They'll take you for about $15.
Adding up all the costs will leave you spending:
1. Cusco - Ollantaytambo: $4
2. Ollantaytambo - Santa Maria: $5
3. Santa Maria - Hydroelectrica: $4
4. Train to Aguas Calientes (x2): $16
5. Hydroelectrica - Cusco : $15
6. Bus to Machu Picchu : $14
7. Accommodation: $6
8. Food: $15
Total: $79
You can skip numbers 4 and 6, saving you another 30 dollars.

Welcome to Machu Picchu poor backpackers!
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(+4)
Cusco, Cusco Region, Peru
Try to get an accommodation in San Blas. For headaches, try Mate de Coca, helps a lot!
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(+2)
Puerto Maldonado, Amazon Basin, Peru
Avoid the hideous shopping centre! If you're just stopping over on your way further south or before heading accross to the national parks, you would do better to stay in Puerto Varas.
Good tip?
(+1)
Machupicchu, Cusco Region, Peru
Without climbing onto Wayna Picchu... it is not the same! It’s the big mountain behind the Machu Picchu complex that gives the character to the whole archaeological site. Although the access is a little bit difficult, the view that you have from the top of the mountain is incredible and it’s worth the effort to climb it. It is a place that you won’t want to miss and will make an unforgettable memory of the citadel for you. After entering the Machu Pichu Citadel you will have to climb for a very narrow and steep path, it will take you 60 minutes to 1 ½ hour to complete it and you will arrive to a place where you will see and amazing landscape of Machu Picchu. You have to enter the Wayna Picchu before 2 pm, and leave it before 4 pm.
Only 300 people per day are allowed to climb on it. So if for example at 10 am 300 people went trough they close the entry!
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(+1)
Disabled Travelers in Peru 
Unfortunately, Peru offers very little help to disabled persons wishing to travel the country. As with most developing countries, Peru’s roads and sidewalks are not wheelchair-friendly, brail is virtually non-existent, public washrooms are cramped and difficult to move around in, and public telephones do not offer services for the hearing impaired.
 
Despite this, Peru is trying to improve its infrastructure to enable greater accessibility for disabled travelers, and certain hotel organizations and several travel agencies and tour operators cater to travelers with disabilities. Disabled travelers considering a trip to Peru should contact the Peruvian embassy in their country and request a copy of “Tourism for People with Disabilities: The First Evaluation of Accessibility to Peru’s Tourist Infrastructure”, a 99 page report that evaluates various hotels, restaurants, sights & attractions and transportation terminals in Peru’s main tourist cities.
Last edited Oct 11, 07 12:39 PM. Contributors:
Working in Peru 

To legally work in Peru, you need an official work visa. This being said, it is possible for travelers and foreigners to find “under the table” work, most commonly as English teachers at language schools. However, Peruvian officials are not happy about this, and are making things increasingly difficult for travelers to work illegally inside the country. It should also be noted that salaries can be quite low.

Last edited Oct 11, 07 12:39 PM. Contributors: