ADD TO LIST
Guess what? You can be the first to write something about Damascus and Southwest Syria! Share your travel knowledge...
Top Cities in Damascus and Southwest Syria
Many people travel to Damascus to enjoy some..
ADD TO LIST
Few travelers choose to stop at Ma'lula when..
ADD TO LIST
Few travelers choose to stop at Shahba' when..
ADD TO LIST
Saydnaya isn't a popular stop for travelers..
ADD TO LIST
Busra ash Sham isn't a particularly popular..
ADD TO LIST
Al Hammah isn't a popular stop for travelers..
ADD TO LIST
Questions answered about visiting Damascus and Southwest Syria
Does anyone know a good bath house for women during Ramadan in Damascus?
Ask a travel question about Damascus and Southwest Syria
Travel Tips from people who've been to Damascus and Southwest Syria
Leila's - just next to Umayyad Mosque, has the best food in Damascus.. And probably the laziest service, but it's worth giving it a go:) Quite expensive in comparison with other restaurants (average european level: dinner for two: 2 drinks, main course, salad, soup, starters- around 1500SP), but affordable- it's worth going there at least once in the evening, to have a dinner on the roof terrace. Unforgettable:)

Good tip?
(+1)
Apurva
256
90
572

An amazing city ... the oldest continuously-inhabited one in the world (the oldest generally, they say, is Varanasi) ... one of the first centres of Islam, the Umaid mosque is not to be missed nor are the souks around it ... but the highlight has to be mind-boggling Syrian hospitality ... met a man on a shared taxi into Syria from Lebanon, he was returning after several days to his wife and children ... he befriended me ... we reached Damascus in the afternoon ... but instead of going home to his family, he - almost out of a sense of duty - stayed with me, showed me around Damascus, offered me a succession of local delicacies in the souks for which he insisted on paying, from falafel to baklava to juice and so on, insisted that I stay with him even though he had a small place and lived with his wife and kids, and when I firmly declined, he insisted on finding me a hotel of my choice, found it, negotiated with the manager, saw to it that I was comfortably settled, then offered me dinner, and then when I said it was late and he must go to his house, he went ... but called from there to make sure I was ok, and offered to return next day to show me around again ... making a real effort the whole while with his broken English .... this is certainly unusual for cities, even conservative ones like Damascus, but it brightened up the whole trip ... a true travel reward ... and even though I said he really must not bother the next day, the memory stayed on ... and such a refreshing change from the border formalities on the Jordan-Syria border a few days ago ... the officers are not used to non-Arabs crossing over by land given the tensions in the region, certainly not Indians, and the rarity was well reflected in their astonishment ... one of them took me to his room, offered me tea and was very polite, but took a full one hour to rummage through the little daypack I was carrying ... poking into every possible zip and corner, flipping strenuously through my Lonely Planet, checking out every pocket and item, while my co-travellers in the shared taxi waited and another officer made frantic calls to get a go-ahead for me ... and it was only after an English-speaking Lebanese co-traveller offered to interpret and facilitate that I was let through ...

Good tip?
(0)
Apurva
256
90
572
An amazing city ... the oldest continuously-inhabited city in the world (the oldest generally, they say, is Varanasi) ... one of the first centres of Islam, the Umaid mosque is not to be missed nor are the souks around it ... but the highlight has to be mind-boggling Syrian hospitality ... met a man on a shared taxi into Syria from Lebanon, he was returning after several days to his wife and children ... he befriended me ... we reached Damascus in the afternoon ... but instead of going home to his family, he - almost out of a sense of duty - stayed with me, showed me around Damascus, offered me a succession of local delicacies in the souks for which he insisted on paying, from falafel to baklava to juice and so on, insisted that I stay with him even though he had a small place and lived with his wife and kids, and when I firmly declined, he insisted on finding me a hotel of my choice, found it, negotiated with the manager, saw to it that I was comfortably settled, then offered me dinner, and then when I said it was late and he must go to his house, he went ... but called from there to make sure I was ok, and offered to return next day to show me around again ... making a real effort the whole while with his broken English .... this is certainly unusual for cities, even conservative ones like Damascus, but it brightened up the whole trip ... a true travel reward ... and even though I said he really must not bother the next day, the memory stayed on ... and such a refreshing change from the border formalities on the Jordan-Syria border a few days ago ... the officers are not used to non-Arabs crossing over by land given the tensions in the region, certainly not Indians, and the rarity was well reflected in their astonishment ... one of them took me to his room, offered me tea and was very polite, but took a full one hour to rummage through the little daypack I was carrying ... poking into every possible zip and corner, flipping strenuously through my Lonely Planet, checking out every pocket and item, while my co-travellers in the shared taxi waited and another officer made frantic calls to get a go-ahead for me ... and it was only after an English-speaking Lebanese co-traveller offered to interpret and facilitate that I was let through ...
Good tip?
(0)
Recent Updates for Damascus and Southwest Syria
1 year ago
2 years ago
2 years ago
Merry J. wrote a review on Bab Touma, Damascus
3 years ago
Muhammad H. updated attraction Muhammad in Damascus
3 years ago
Nienke V. wrote a review on Bab Touma, Damascus
3 years ago
0 Travelers have been to Damascus and Southwest Syria
Ask a travel question about Damascus and Southwest Syria
Bradt Travel Guides
$22.95